Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a question that seems basic, but I can't figure out. Say that I have a hash reference in Perl. I want to get an array of values through an array of keys.

Here's how it'd work with a hash, not a hash reference:

my %testHash = ( "a" => 1, "b" => 2, "c" => 3 );
my @testKeys = ("a", "b", "c");

my @testValues = @testHash{@testKeys};

Now suppose I have a hash reference,

my $hashRef = {"a" => 1, "b" => 2, "c" => 3};

I've tried the following two ways:

my @values = @{$hashRef->{@testKeys}};
my @values = $hashRef->{@testKeys};

But neither is correct. Is there a correct way, or do I just have to dereference the hash ref every time I want to do this?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You're close:

my @values = @$hashref{@testKeys};     ## (1)

or

my @values = @{$hashref}{@testKeys};   ## (2)

For more examples, see "Slices" in the perllol documentation.

"Using References" in the perlref documentation gives the general rules.

1. Anywhere you'd put an identifier (or chain of identifiers) as part of a variable or subroutine name, you can replace the identifier with a simple scalar variable containing a reference of the correct type.

This explains why (1) works: you replaced the identifier testHash with the simple scalar $hashRef.

2. Anywhere you'd put an identifier (or chain of identifiers) as part of a variable or subroutine name, you can replace the identifier with a BLOCK returning a reference of the correct type.

Snippet (2) above is nearly the same but has a little bulkier syntax. In place of the identifier testHash, you write a block returning a reference to a hash, i.e., {$hashRef}.

The braces here enclose a bona fide block, so you can compute and return a reference, as in

push @{ $cond ? \@a1 : \@a2 }, "some value";
share|improve this answer
2  
In this case, @$hashref{@testKeys} works too. I used to prefer {} braces as more explicit, but I'd lean towards the less noisy variant now. –  ephemient Nov 15 '11 at 4:59
    
@ephemient Thanks for helping me improve the answer. –  Greg Bacon Nov 15 '11 at 13:53
    
Ahh, I guess I was trapped by my lack of understanding that the arrow is just a convenient shorthand. –  xiongtx Nov 15 '11 at 20:18
    
Just so I can understand the use of the arrow better, is there a way to do this with the arrow? It seems that @$hashRef->{@testKeys} should work, but it doesn't. I think there's an issue with order of precedence of the operators. –  xiongtx Nov 15 '11 at 20:27
    
@user864684 The same perlref section describes arrows as syntactic sugar: "3. Subroutine calls and lookups of individual array elements ..." A slice looks up multiple elements, so the arrow syntax doesn't apply. –  Greg Bacon Nov 16 '11 at 10:30
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.