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I have a bankAccount object I'd like to increment using the constructor. The objective is to have it increment with every new object the class instantiates.

Note: I've overriden the ToString() to display the accountType and accountNumber;

Here is my code:

public class SavingsAccount
{
    private static int accountNumber = 1000;
    private bool active;
    private decimal balance;

    public SavingsAccount(bool active, decimal balance, string accountType)
    {
        accountNumber++;
        this.active = active;
        this.balance = balance;
        this.accountType = accountType;
    }
}

Why is it that when I plug this in main like so:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        SavingsAccount potato = new SavingsAccount(true, 100.0m, "Savings");
        SavingsAccount magician = new SavingsAccount(true, 200.0m, "Savings");
        Console.WriteLine(potato.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine(magician.ToString());
    }
}

The output I get does not increment it individually i.e.

savings 1001
savings 1002

but instead I get:

savings 1002
savings 1002

How do I make it to be the former and not the latter?

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Your code above is not the code you're using, can you please post the code you're using? –  user7116 Nov 15 '11 at 6:39
2  
even once fixed (see the flood of correct answers) this is a very poor way of generating account numbers - is this just for some kind of academic exercise? –  Adam Ralph Nov 15 '11 at 6:43
    
Please read difference between static and instance variables, getting answer to your this question will not help. –  Akash Kava Nov 15 '11 at 6:45
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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Because a static variable is shared among all instances of the class. What you want is a static variable to keep the global count and a non-static variable to save the current count at the time of instantiation. Change your code above to:

public class SavingsAccount
{
    private static int accountNumber = 1000;
    private bool active;
    private decimal balance;
    private int myAccountNumber;

    public SavingsAccount(bool active, decimal balance, string accountType)
    {
        myAccountNumber = ++accountNumber;
        this.active = active;
        this.balance = balance;
        this.accountType = accountType;
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        SavingsAccount potato = new SavingsAccount(true, 100.0m, "Savings");
        SavingsAccount magician = new SavingsAccount(true, 200.0m, "Savings");
        Console.WriteLine(potato.ToString());
        Console.WriteLine(magician.ToString());
    }
}

And then in your ToString() overload you should print myAccountNumber instead of the static variable.

share|improve this answer
1  
And note that I moved the ++ before accountNumber so it increments before the assignment rather than after. –  Brandon Moore Nov 15 '11 at 6:44
    
What is the advantage of preincrementing vs post incrementing? –  iggy2012 Nov 15 '11 at 6:53
    
Assume x = 100. 'y = x++' will set y to 100 whereas 'y = ++x' will set y to 101. It tells the compiler whether to increment x before or after the assignment takes place. –  Brandon Moore Nov 15 '11 at 6:57
1  
precommenting and postcommenting comes into concern while assignment only. In the answer above. If he had used the post increment, the same value of accountNumber would have been assigned to myAccountNumber without the increment –  Pankaj Upadhyay Nov 15 '11 at 6:57
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Because it is a static variable. It is shared by all instances of the class. You need to save off the incremented value to an instance variable.

public class SavingsAccount
{
    private static int accountNumberCounter = 1000;
    private int accountNumber;
    private bool active;
    private decimal balance;

    public BankAccount(bool active, decimal balance, string accountType)
    {
        accountNumberCounter++;
        this.accountNumber = accountNumberCounter;

        this.active = active;
        this.balance = balance;
        this.accountType = accountType;
    }

    public string ToString() 
    {
        return String.Format("{0} {1}", accountType, accountNumber);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Way to copy my answer ;) –  Brandon Moore Nov 15 '11 at 6:46
    
You got me, I copied your answer. Because this was such a tough question, surely we couldn't have typed out the same solution at the same time :) –  Matt Greer Nov 15 '11 at 6:50
    
I'm just giving you a hard time. And... I had to make sure he knew I wrote it first so I got credit, haha –  Brandon Moore Nov 15 '11 at 6:56
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You have declared the variable account as static which means its instantiated at class level and not instance level. So when you do the increment it happens two times for when one variable.

The possible way to achieve what you want is to insert the print command between the two.

share|improve this answer
    
Inserting the print command won't accomplish what he is after. It will just momentarily look correct, but actually be incorrect. –  Matt Greer Nov 15 '11 at 6:45
    
I know that....Thats why i first explained what he is doing is wrong and then gave the hack. If he needs to work with just two instance, he can do this. –  Pankaj Upadhyay Nov 15 '11 at 6:46
    
Even with two instances it's still wrong. Both instances think they have the same account number. I wouldn't want to bank there :) –  Matt Greer Nov 15 '11 at 6:47
    
mate i know that.....Think of it in this way: If you don't have access to the SavingsAccount, then what will you do. It's basically a hack which won't diverge him in wrong direction but help him understand why this is happening. It's a practical example of learning what is going on under the hood :-) –  Pankaj Upadhyay Nov 15 '11 at 6:50
    
Ah yeah, true, printing between instantiation is a good way to gain more knowledge on what's going on. Fair enough. –  Matt Greer Nov 15 '11 at 6:53
show 1 more comment

Try this:

public class SavingsAccount
{
    private static int accountNumberMarker = 1000;
    private int accountNumber;
    private bool active;
    private decimal balance;

    public SavingsAccount(bool active, decimal balance, string accountType)
    {
        accountNumber = ++accountNumberMarker;
        this.active = active;
        this.balance = balance;
        this.accountType = accountType;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

you can try

        SavingsAccount potato = new SavingsAccount(true, 100.0m, "Savings");
        Console.WriteLine(potato.ToString());
        SavingsAccount magician = new SavingsAccount(true, 200.0m, "Savings");
        Console.WriteLine(magician.ToString());

then , you could get you want.

The static variable has only one copy in entire runtime. No matter how many times created the class's instance , the variable is referring to the same memory location.

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Because a static is shared with all members in the class?

You want a static variable like you have now for a global number that you can increment, but you also want a private variable specific to that account. Hence, you should add this:

private int thisAccountNumber;

...to the class definition, and modify your existing line in the constructor to read:

thisAccountNumber = accountNumber++;

Then use thisAccountNumber as you will.

share|improve this answer
    
You want a static variable like you have now for a global number that you can increment, but you also want a private variable specific to that account. Hence, you should add this: "private int thisAccountNumber" to the class definition, and modify your existing line in the constructor to read "thisAccountNumber = accountNumber++." Then use "thisAccountNumber" as you will. –  user978122 Nov 15 '11 at 6:45
    
Well, "private int thisAccountNumber = 0" to keep things safe. –  user978122 Nov 15 '11 at 6:46
    
Small note, in a .Net class any instance variable will be initialized automagically to their default value (default(T)) which in this case will be 0. –  user7116 Nov 15 '11 at 6:55
    
Indeed. Still, it's a good practice, especially in other not so nice languages. ^_^ –  user978122 Nov 15 '11 at 7:09
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