Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a program that scans in values from the console and stores them in the array. I'm trying to allow the user to specify the length of the array using the scanner. An array length as you know, can only be positive, so I'm trying to check, here's what I have so far that in my mind should be working.

    int[] array; 
int index = 0;

max = new Scanner(System.in);

System.out.println("How long is your array?");

while (!max.hasNextInt() || max.nextInt() <=0 ) 
{
  System.out.println("Arrays aren't negative, unless your's is " +
                "smaller then physically posible, try again");
  max.next(); 
}
maxSize = max.nextInt();


array = new int[maxSize];

System.out.println("Enter up to " + maxSize + " integers");

input = new Scanner(System.in);


while(input.hasNextInt())
{
  array[index] = input.nextInt();
  index++;
}

return array;

It's working somewhat, here's the output How long is your array?

-2

Arrays aren't negative, unless your's is smaller then physically posible, try again

-3

-4

Arrays aren't negative, unless your's is smaller then physically posible, try again

2

3

4

Enter up to 4 integers

Any help is appreciated, and also it does not seem to be storing the array at all so any help with that is appreciated however I just while testing the max size so I'm going to try and figure it out. I'm thinking it may be from using two scanners now that I'm looking at my code, this is my first experience with scanners. Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Got it working thanks for the help!! –  Erik Nov 15 '11 at 7:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

max.nextInt() <=0 reads from the scanner, but if you do so, you miss storing the value.

you will want something like this:

int[] array; 
Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
System.out.println("How long is your array?");
int len = sc.nextInt();
while (len <= 0) {
    System.out.println("Arrays aren't negative, unless your's is " +
                "smaller then physically posible, try again");
    len = sc.nextInt(); 
}
array = new int[len];

also. it is pointless to use 2 scanners on system.in. use the same scanner object.

use scanner.hasNextInt() if you want to enter multiple values in the same line

share|improve this answer
    
Noted, two scanners is bad, thank you –  Erik Nov 15 '11 at 7:12
    
Wait wouldn't !len <= 0 return true only when it is negative? –  Erik Nov 15 '11 at 7:16
    
len <= 0 will return true for non-positive (negative or 0) –  galchen Nov 15 '11 at 7:49

The trouble is that you're reading once to check the size, then you're reading the size separately.

I would extract it into a separate method, which should make life easier in terms of the readability of your bigger method.

public static int readNonNegativeInteger(Scanner scanner)
{
    // You may want some way of letting the user quit...
    while (true)
    {
        while (!scanner.hasNextInt())
        {
            System.out.println("Please enter an integer.");
            scanner.next();
        }
        int candidate = scanner.nextInt();
        if (candidate >= 0)
        {
            // Success!
            return candidate;
        }
        System.out.println("The value must be non-negative. Please try again.");
    }
}

Note that while (true) loops are relatively rare and some commenters may object. However, in this case it feels like the simplest approach to me - we want to keep going until we've successfully read a value, and the way we break isn't by satisfying a condition - it's by returning. I suspect it would be hard to find a clearer way of expressing the same flow without repeating the condition or having a pointless "done" variable.

share|improve this answer
    
...I see now, that would make things go haywire. –  Erik Nov 15 '11 at 7:09
    
also would the parameter be max not scanner? –  Erik Nov 15 '11 at 7:10
    
@Erik: No, it should be scanner as a rather more descriptive name than max - but I should have used scanner in the body of the method too :) Fixed now. –  Jon Skeet Nov 15 '11 at 7:11
    
Haha thanks for the help! –  Erik Nov 15 '11 at 7:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.