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Is there a built in way (LINQ maybe?) of taking all the row values from a specific column from a DataTable and creating a HashSet from it? The column is also of type String.

I could obviously do this in a loop but I was wondering if there is another way?

I'm using .net 3.5 btw.

Thanks,

AJ

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What have you tried so far? –  Rowland Shaw Nov 15 '11 at 8:37
    
Well DataTable.Columns[0] will give you a list right. You can use Linq extension on that and do what ever you want. –  zenwalker Nov 15 '11 at 8:41

4 Answers 4

try this, but not sure of how to copy the array values for hashtable values without loop.

string[] strArray = datatable.AsEnumerable().Select(s => s.Field<string>("MyContent")).ToArray<string>();

Then copy things to hashtable values (loop is one way).

Hope it helps.

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Thanks, yes it did, I also used the HashSet<T>.Union method to merge the results with my existing hashset. –  AJ. Nov 15 '11 at 15:57
    
can you post the your code –  Sandy Nov 16 '11 at 16:33

Use HashSet<T> Constructor (IEnumerable<T>)

Reference: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb301504.aspx

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Create a extension method

public static class Extensions
{
    public static HashSet<T> ToHashSet<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
    {
        return new HashSet<T>(source);
    }
}

then call

HashSet<string> values = table.AsEnumerable().Select(row => row.Field<string>("Columnname")).ToHashSet();
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My proposal using LINQ:

    IEnumerable<string> values = 
        dataTable
        .Rows
        .Cast<DataRow>()
        .Select(row => row["ColumnName"])
        .Cast<string>();

    HashSet<string> hashSet = new HashSet<string>(values);
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