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OS: Linux(RedHat) Programming Language: C++

I need to create a daemon(process) for Linux using C++ that will continuously listen on a custom port for PHP requests. The PHP will send the request data in XML form to the daemon, the daemon will parse the XML using Xerces and send back an appropriate reply in XML form to the PHP page.

I have successfully created a daemon process listening on port 4646 on localhost, but what I can't figure out is how the request from PHP will go to the daemon and how will the daemon send the reply back.

I tried google-ing for this particular problem but couldn't find a solution at all. Any kind of help on this problem will be very much appreciated.

I have also read a little about PHP daemons, but I'm not sure whether they are applicable in this particular scenario.

This approach is not hard and fast so any alternative approach will also do. The only thing hard and fast is the results i.e succesful communication between the PHP pages and the daemon.

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Have you tried curl yet? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 15 '11 at 9:08
    
Why do you need that, and what do you call PHP requests? (usually with PHP, the requests are HTTP requests!). –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 15 '11 at 9:08
    
@Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams No I haven't tried curl yet, but will look into it and get back to you in case i'm still stuck, thanks a lot... –  Pratik Patel Nov 15 '11 at 9:10
    
@BasileStarynkevitch you are right, actually the request is from the PHP pages but I'm not sure wether they will be HTTP, will depend upon what type of requests my daemon is set to recieve.. –  Pratik Patel Nov 15 '11 at 9:12
    
Depending on your application, it may also be worthwhile to write a library that is loaded into the PHP interpreter. –  Simon Richter Nov 15 '11 at 9:24
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Its better that u can use the php socket library to connect with the daemon running in your system and then u can pass data to the daemon and can process the result sent back by the daemon .

You can refer the PHP Socket Library for creating code to do socket connection with daemon ...

I think this is a better option than using CURL as the daemon is also a custom socket interface , CURL will be most suitable for HTTP request's , but i think here the daemon is not an HTTP one..

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Will look into it, Thanks a lot...will get back to you if I have any trouble... –  Pratik Patel Nov 15 '11 at 9:14
    
The nice thing about custom daemons is that the protocol can be anything desired. And hooking into an existing HTTP daemon is easy enough. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 15 '11 at 9:14
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams thanks again, actually I am a beginner when it comes to C, sockets and daemons since I normally code in PHP and Java. I still haven't figured out how to set the request type for my daemon and to serve the incoming requests, as of now, my daemon is a chat server that listens on a port for incoming requests and writes all the text, received from the client, to a file. And every time my client disconnects, the daemon dies, any idea what the problem might be? –  Pratik Patel Nov 15 '11 at 9:25
    
You probably forgot to set a handler for the signal sent when a socket disconnects. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 15 '11 at 9:27
    
@IgnacioVazquez-Abrams I guess so, since i have copy pasted the signal handler code from a tutorial but forgot to edit it to suit my daemon. thanks again...appriciate all the help from everyone of you... –  Pratik Patel Nov 15 '11 at 9:33
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Question is rather confused.

I need to create a daemon(process) for Linux using C/C++

Why does it have to be written in C or C++?

I have also read a little about PHP daemons, but I'm not sure whether they are applicable

Does that mean it doesn't need to be written in C/++? Why do you think they might not be applicable?

the daemon will parse the XML using Xerces

Why does it have to use Xerces? Presumably the daemon is supposed to do something more than just parse XML and compose a response - what else does it do?

Writing a daemon is not a trivial process. Writing a socket server is not a trivial process. It is somewhat simplified by implementing a well defined protocol at each end.

...which rather begs the question, why not just use HTTP as the protocol and a webserver to implement the server stuff, and seperate the application-specific logic into a [f]CGI program. And taking this one step further, why not implement the application-specific logic using PHP.

The only thing hard and fast is the results i.e succesful communication between the PHP pages and the daemon

Some options:

  1. Write the application specific part as a PHP page then invoke it via an HTTP request using curl

  2. Write the server as a single tasking stdio server and use [x]inetd to invoke it, handling the client side connection as a network socket (requires that you define your protocol)

  3. Write a forking server daemon in PHP handling the connection at both ends as a network socket (requires that you define your protocol)

  4. write a single threaded server daemon (using socket_select) in PHP handling the connection at both ends as a network socket (requires that you define your protocol)

Of course anywhere I've mentioned PHP above, you could equally use C, C++, Perl, Java....etc.

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I assume the constraints are all because this is homework... –  SoapBox Nov 15 '11 at 13:19
    
@symcbean, thanks a lot for the help, i absolutely agree with what you suggest but as i mentioned before, I'm new to low level stuff and heading in different directions with the same problem is not going to help so as of now I'm sticking to creating a socket server daemon in c and using PHP sockets for the communication between the two and to be true, I am almost there... But again, appreciate you taking the time and providing me the the alternatives, will definitely look into it later but for now, i need to complete the task at hand since time is of great importance to me right now... –  Pratik Patel Nov 16 '11 at 4:48
    
@SoapBox there are no constraints at all, as i mentioned in the question that the approach is not hard and fast, the thing is that I'm new to this stuff and I have an idea of implementing my own system and the approach i specified in the question earlier is just a suggestion from a friend and since the friend is not able to helm me out with the approach he specified, i mentioned that any kind of alternatives to solving my problem are welcome... if it was a homework, i would definitely specify...anyways thanks for looking into the problem.. –  Pratik Patel Nov 16 '11 at 4:56
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xinetd / inetd might be a bit old skool but can make this easy and scalable (with in limits)

Inetd will call you program and send the the traffic to stdin and your stdout will go to the connection. As long as you dont need shared information it stops you having to worry about making the program bug free/no memory leaks etc....

Simon Loader

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@SimonLoader thanks a lot, will look into that too, infact while searching for the solution on Google i did come across some code that used inetd, i still have it bookmarked so will surely try it... –  Pratik Patel Nov 15 '11 at 9:39
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