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What is the best way in c# to get the same result of javascript date.gettime() call?

The getTime() method returns the number of milliseconds since midnight of January 1, 1970 and the specified date.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can use this solution...

  private Int64 GetTime()
  {
      Int64 retval=0;
      var  st=  new DateTime(1970,1,1);
      TimeSpan t= (DateTime.Now.ToUniversalTime()-st);
       retval= (Int64)(t.TotalMilliseconds+0.5);
      return retval;
  }
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This worked but there was some typos. Forgot a ; on second to last line, plus you forgot a "new" on st=DateTime. Once I added those, it solved my problem. Thanks! –  Michael Nov 15 '11 at 9:58
    
@Michael Thanks i have edited that .... –  pratap k Nov 15 '11 at 9:59
    
@errorstacks why +0.5 ? can you explain ? –  Royi Namir Nov 15 '11 at 11:07
    
The + 0.5 is a quick way to round up when you convert to a whole number :) –  Jeremi Stadler Oct 13 '12 at 15:24
    
@pratapk is it possible that rounding the result (+0.5) cause some inaccuracy in the result ? –  pouria Sep 16 '13 at 8:22

Since JavaScript time is with respect to UTC, I think you will need something like this:

DateTime st=new DateTime(1970,1,1);
TimeSpan t= (DateTime.Now.ToUniversalTime()-st);
//t.TotalMilliseconds

Now you can use the TotalMilliseconds property of the Timespan.

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+1 for respecting UTC –  Daniel Hilgarth Nov 15 '11 at 9:39

The Java and JavaScript Date.getTime() methods return the number of milliseconds since 1 Jan 1970 00:00:00 GMT.

Since .NET represents dates in Ticks (1 Tick = 0.1 nanoseconds or 0.0001 milliseconds) since 1 Jan 0001 00:00:00 GMT, we must use a conversion formula where 621355968000000000 is the offset between the base dates in Ticks and 10000 the number of Ticks per Millisecond.

Ticks = (MilliSeconds * 10000) + 621355968000000000
MilliSeconds = (Ticks - 621355968000000000) / 10000
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Thanks; works really nice when passing new Date().getTime() from Javascript to server... just do new DateTime(long.Parse(timeSpan)*10000 + 621355968000000000); –  kape123 Dec 26 '11 at 6:42

I guess this will do the trick :)

public double MilliTimeStamp(DateTime TheDate)
        {
            DateTime d1 = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1);
            DateTime d2 = TheDate.ToUniversalTime();
            TimeSpan ts = new TimeSpan(d2.Ticks - d1.Ticks);

            return ts.TotalMilliseconds;
        }
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3  
TimeSpan ts = new TimeSpan(d2.Ticks - d1.Ticks); can be simplified to TimeSpan ts = d2 - d1; –  Daniel Hilgarth Nov 15 '11 at 9:39
(DateTime.Now - new DateTime (1970, 1, 1)).TotalMilliseconds
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1  
It should be new DateTime(1970, 1, 1). –  Daniel Hilgarth Nov 15 '11 at 9:38
    
Oh yeah, it's javascript that's weirdly zero-based, isn't it? –  Tim Rogers Nov 15 '11 at 9:45

The correct implementation (assuming the current time) is as follows:

DateTime utcNow = DateTime.UtcNow;
DateTime epoch = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0 DateTimeKind.Utc);
long ts = (long)((utcNow - epoch).TotalMilliseconds);
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