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class baseClass():
  def __init__(self,mark,name):
    self.mark = mark
    self.name = name

class derivedClass(baseClass):

b1 = derivedClass(name='Jibin')
print b1.name

This was my code initially & it worked fine.

(Note: I don't have access to baseClass)

But later I had to pass a additional attribute rank to derivedClass.So I edited the code like this.

class baseClass():
  def __init__(self,mark,name):
    self.mark = mark
    self.name = name

class derivedClass(baseClass):
  def __init__(self,rank):
    self.rank = rank 

b1 = derivedClass(name='Jibin')
print b1.name

This caused an error __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'name'

This was expected as the __init__ of derivedClass do not have a argument name.

I don't want to add an additional argument name to __init__ of derivedClass b'cos in real baseClass has ten arguments instead of 2(mark,name) & if i give all them as additional argument to derivedClass I will be cluttering its argument list.

Note: I am aware of initializing baseClass using baseClass.__init__(self) or super(derivedClass, self).__init__()

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4  
Your code as written is horribly broken. Please verify that the anonymized code still works before submitting it. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 15 '11 at 10:01
1  
PEP 8 would like you to rename baseClass to BaseClass, derivedClass to DerivedClass and put in spaces after the commas in the arguments of the method declarations. –  Chris Morgan Nov 15 '11 at 10:02
1  
currently, the derived class has no relation to your base class. And why do not you use new-style classes? –  newtover Nov 15 '11 at 10:05
    
@ Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams .It has nothing to do with anonymity.I was working in django & I came across this problem.I knew its a python problem.So there was no need to put all the complexities of django forms & views in here.Nevertheless my apologies for the broken code –  Jibin Nov 16 '11 at 5:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Maybe you can try something like this

class BaseClass(object):
  def __init__(self, mark=None, name=None):   # you're using named parameters, declare them as named one.
    self.mark = mark
    self.name = name

class DerivedClass(BaseClass):   # don't forget to declare inheritance
  def __init__(self, rank, *args, **kwargs):    # in args, kwargs, there will be all parameters you don't care, but needed for baseClass
    super(DerivedClass, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
    self.rank = rank 

b1 = derivedClass(name='Jibin')
print b1.name
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1  
baseClass needs to be new-style for super to work. –  Björn Pollex Nov 15 '11 at 10:06
    
@BjörnPollex : right, corrected –  Cédric Julien Nov 15 '11 at 10:16
    
Thanks.But what is it with # you're using named parameters, declare them as named one..If I don't give default values to arguments it won't be named arguments? –  Jibin Nov 15 '11 at 10:26
    
@Jibin : you call derivedClass(name='Jibin'), this is a named parameter, it is more coherent if you declare this parameter as a named one. –  Cédric Julien Nov 15 '11 at 10:51
    
Its just that I don't wan't to give default values to arguments to make it required arguments. –  Jibin Nov 16 '11 at 5:18

This blog describes how to solve this sort of problem. The solution is to have base as well as derived accept a **kwargs argument in their __init__ and pass that to the call to super.

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derivedClass is not in fact derived from baseClass. To subclass in python you must provide the parent class to the class definition thus:

class DerivedClass(BaseClass):
    pass

DerivedClass now inherits the methods of BaseClass, including __init__(). If you do not override a method, calling it on your subclass actually calls the method as defined on the superclass.

So, if you want to allow DerivedClass(name='Jibin'), you need to provide a specialised init():

class BaseClass(object):
    def __init__(self, mark, name):
        self.mark = mark
        self.name = name

class DerivedClass(BaseClass):
    def __init__(self, mark, name, rank):
        BaseClass.__init__(self, mark, name)
        self.rank = rank

Now, you also want to support additional keyword arguments to DerivedClass() without adding them explicitly. One way to achieve this is to assign all kwargs to instance attributes, thus:

class BaseClass(object):
    def __init__(self, mark, name, **kwargs):
        self.mark = mark
        self.name = name
        self.__dict__.update(kwargs)

I don't advise this 'for real' though. Blindly setting attributes is likely to introduce subtle bugs in the future (such things as unknowingly replacing a method by passing a keyword arg of the same name)

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Have you guys tried [Python] cast base class to derived class

I have tested it, and seems it works. Also I think this method is bit better than below one since below one does not execute init function of derived function.

c.__class__ = CirclePlus
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