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I have an abstract immutable base class that defines enforces child classes to be initialized, hence the abstract calls instead of an interface:

public abstract BaseLookup<TPoint, TItem>
{
    protected IEnumerable<TItem> items = null;

    protected BaseLookup(IEnumerable<TItem> items)
    {
        this.items = items;
        this.Initialize();
    }

    public abstract void Initialize();

    // problem deciding which one

    // either implementing a method...
    public abstract TItem GetItem(TPoint point);

    // ...or assigning a method
    public Func<TPoint, TItem> GetItem { get; protected set; }
}

GetItem execution has to be as fast as possible. During initialization stage I have to check initial items and decide what GetItem method should do. It can be one of many implementations based on this set of items.

Since GetItem method has to be as fast as possible it seems much better to have it defined as a property and assign it a straight forward branch-less lambda expression. But using above definition child classes are not forced to set any values to it so implementers may create an invalid child class. Defining an abstract accessor on the property would force them to implement the property which is semantically the same as implementing a method. This doesn't enforce property assignment.

But if I implement it as an overridden abstract method that particular method will need to include all those branches that branch based on items. This means that these branches would get evaluated every time I'd call the method hence making it slow(er).

What I'm actually looking for is a way to force child class implementers to set GetItem property.

How am I supposed to do that?

Also take into consideration that this class will get initialized once and then be used many many times. Used as in calling the GetItem method.

A simplified example class (using property)

public class IteratorLookup<TPoint, TItem> : BaseLookup<TPoint, TItem>
{
    private TItem single = null;

    public IteratorLookup(IEnumerable<TItem> items) : base(items);

    public override void Initialize()
    {
        if (this.items != null && this.items.Count > 0)
        {
            if (this.items.Count > 1)
            {
                this.GetItem = point => this.items[this.GetIndex(point)];
            }
            else
            {
                this.GetItem = irrelevant => this.single;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            this.GetItem = irrelevant => null;
        }
    }

    private int GetIndex(TPoint point) { ... }
}

A simplified example class (using a method)

public class IteratorLookup<TPoint, TItem> : BaseLookup<TPoint, TItem>
{
    private TItem single = null;

    public IteratorLookup(IEnumerable<TItem> items) : base(items);

    public override void Initialize()
    {
        // implementing minor speed up
        if (this.items != null && this.items.Count == 1)
        {
            this.single = items[0];
        }
    }

    public override TItem GetItem(TPoint point)
    {
        if (this.items != null && this.items.Count > 0)
        {
            if (this.items.Count > 1)
            {
                return this.items[this.GetIndex(point)];
            }
            return this.single;
        }
        return null;
    }

    private int GetIndex(TPoint point) { ... }
}
share|improve this question
4  
(1) Calling abstract members in a constructor is something you normally should avoid. (2) Have you actually measured the time difference between the branching version and the non-branching version? I assume that calling the delegate is slower than executing the branches. --> It sounds like premature optimization to me. – Daniel Hilgarth Nov 15 '11 at 10:13
    
Besides the remarks I just made, I don't really understand what you want to do :-) Someone calls GetItem with a certain TPoint instance. Now you want to execute a certain functionality. Is this the same functionality for every call to GetItem? And this functionality is chosen in Initialize based on the items passed into the constructor? – Daniel Hilgarth Nov 15 '11 at 10:16
    
@DanielHilgarth: calling abstract members should be avoided yes, but they will have an implementation anyway because otherwise code wouldn't compile. And based on your comments I edited my question by providing some more code to see what I mean... – Robert Koritnik Nov 15 '11 at 10:30
    
I don't know why you think that calling an abstract method is any different from calling a virtual method. The problem with calling virtual methods (and for that matter abstract ones) is that the constructor of the derived class has not yet executed and thus you are working on an object that is not fully instantiated! See here for a bit more info. – Daniel Hilgarth Nov 15 '11 at 11:05
    
BTW: You didn't answer my question about performance comparison. Did you compare the code you posted with the version that contains the branch directly in the method? – Daniel Hilgarth Nov 15 '11 at 11:18
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since GetItem method has to be as fast as possible it seems much better to have it defined as a property and assign it a straight forward branch-less lambda expression

What makes you think it will be faster than a method? The abstract method is the way to go here. It's a more natural approach, and it doesn't have the issue that the property might not be initialized.

But if I implement it as an overridden abstract method that particular method will need to include all those branches that branch based on items. This means that these branches would get evaluated every time I'd call the method hence making it slow(er).

Not sure what you mean by that... what prevents you from putting in the GetItem method the same code you would have put in a Func<TPoint, TItem> in the GetItem property?

As a side note, you should probably think twice about calling a virtual method (Initialize) in the constructor, it can lead to unexpected issues: the base constructor is executed before the derived constructor, but it's always the most derived implementation of Initialize that will be called; so if the derived implementation of Initialize relies on things that are initialized in the derived class constructor, it will fail because they won't be initialized yet.

share|improve this answer
    
first my Initialize is abstract and not virtual which makes it safer and second look at my added two examples to explain a bit what you're confused about. Using a property instead of a method makes my GetItem method calls branchless. Just simple returns. – Robert Koritnik Nov 15 '11 at 10:44
    
@RobertKoritnik: About calling abstract methods is safer than calling virtual methods in a ctor, please see my comment to your question. It's just not true. – Daniel Hilgarth Nov 15 '11 at 11:07
    
@RobertKoritnik, an abstract method is virtual: not only it can be overriden, but it must be overriden... – Thomas Levesque Nov 15 '11 at 11:09

You need to inject somewhat an aspect to your issue. Properties are quite straight forward where you cannot ensure that subclasses has invoked it or not.

You make take advantage of GetItem method making it from abstract to virtual and your base class's implementation will be throwing an exception.

public virtual TItem GetItem(TPoint point)
{
    throw new Exception("Please implement GetItem method");
}

Now, any of the subclasses not overriding this method will fall into exception and ensure subclasses to implement GetItem method.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would I force implementers to implement a virtual method by throwing an exception (that would blow up their app) when I can mark it as abstract and force them to implement it during development since their code won't compile without implementation??? – Robert Koritnik Nov 15 '11 at 10:48
3  
When you want developers to implement a method it's a much better alternative to mark that method as abstract than virtual. Unless you do need to implement some base functionality of course. But even in that case you could mitigate the problem with private implemented method calling an abstract. – Robert Koritnik Nov 15 '11 at 10:51
1  
You really should avoid doing such stuff. (1) Use NotImplementedException. (2) Don't do it. As Robert points out, simply make it abstract! – Daniel Hilgarth Nov 15 '11 at 11:08

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