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char buffer[128]
ret = scanf("%s %s", buffer);

This only allows me to print the first string fed into console. How can I scan two strings?

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Increase the warning level of your compiler, and mind the warnings. –  pmg Nov 15 '11 at 10:30
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4 Answers

char buffer[128], buffer2[128];
ret = scanf("%s %s", buffer, buffer2);
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if you want to reuse buffer you need two calls to scanf, one for each string.

ret = scanf("%s", buffer);
/* Check that ret == 1 (one item read) and use contents of buffer */

ret = scanf("%s", buffer);
/* Check that ret == 1 (one item read) and use contents of buffer */

If you want to use two buffers then you can combine this into a single call to scanf:

ret = scanf("%s%s", buffer1, buffer2);
/* Check that ret == 2 (two items read) and use contents of the buffers */

Note that reading strings like this is inherently insecure as there is nothing preventing a long string input from the console overflowing a buffer. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scanf#Security.

To fix this you should specify the maximum length of the strings to be read in (minus the terminating null character). Using your example of buffers of 128 chars:

ret = scanf("%127s%127s", buffer1, buffer2);
/* Check that ret == 2 (two items read) and use contents of the buffers */
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Why is this needed ? Can you not adapt scanf to accept two strings ? –  Simon Over Nov 15 '11 at 10:29
1  
This answer is perfectly correct if you want to store both strings in one buffer, processing them one after another. With two strings you have two pointers, two buffers, two memory allocations to clean up. I give +1. –  Dadam Nov 15 '11 at 10:35
    
I believe both alternatives work, don't they? –  Matthew Murdoch Nov 15 '11 at 10:36
    
@SimonOver: for each conversion specifier in the format string that doesn't have an assignment suppression flag on it, there must be a corresponding argument of the correct type. If you have a format string of "%s %s", you must supply two additional arguments of type char *. That's simply how scanf works; it's not sophisticated enough to know that you want to append the second input to the first in the same buffer. –  John Bode Nov 15 '11 at 13:37
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You need to choose two different locations for the first and second strings.

char buffer1[100], buffer2[100];
if (scanf("%99s%99s", buffer1, buffer2) != 2) /* deal with error */;
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If you know the number of words you want to read, you can read it as :

char buffer1[128], buffer2[128];
ret = scanf("%s %s", buffer1, buffer2);

Alternatively you can use fgets() function to get multiword strings .

  fgets(buffer, 128 , stdin);

See Example

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