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Main AppDomain have some child AppDomains. In child AppDomain may be UnhandledException. How to unload child AppDomain by UnhandledException in child AppDomain.

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2  
Try adding a c# or vb.net tag or whatever language you are using to help improve the view count on your question. –  LarsTech Nov 15 '11 at 15:42
    
You'd be better off trying to get to the root of the UnhandledException –  David Kemp Nov 16 '11 at 12:14
    
From the documentation at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.appdomain.unload.aspx it would seem this is a very messy buisness. Specifically it is not guaranteed to succeed, might kill some threads and not others. Unless the child AppDomains are very simple and predictable I would not advise this. –  Captain Coder Nov 16 '11 at 12:21
    
It requires at least a custom CLR host that calls ICLRPolicyManager::SetActionOnFailure(). You can't write custom hosts in C#. –  Hans Passant Nov 16 '11 at 13:51

1 Answer 1

This can be done by try ... finally ..., without registering an UnhandledException event handler:

using System;
using System.Reflection;

interface IFoo
{
  void DoGood();
  void DoBad();
}

class Foo : MarshalByRefObject, IFoo
{
  public void DoGood() { Console.WriteLine("I'm good (" + AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName + ")"); }
  public void DoBad() { throw new Exception("I'm bad (" + AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName + ")"); }
}

class Program
{
  public static void Main()
  {
    try
    {
      AppDomain domain = AppDomain.CreateDomain("FooDomain");
      try
      {
        string assemblyName = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().FullName; // may be different assembly
        string typeName = "Foo";
        IFoo foo = (IFoo)domain.CreateInstanceAndUnwrap(assemblyName, typeName); 
        foo.DoGood();
        foo.DoBad();
      }
      finally
      {
        AppDomain.Unload(domain);
      }
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
      Console.WriteLine("Error: " + e.Message);
    }
  }
}

The output is:

I'm good (FooDomain)
Error: I'm bad (FooDomain)
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