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I'm running an online automatic program evaluation platform and for one of the exercises the Java "Scanner" is using way too much memory (we are just starting to support Java so the problem did not arise before). As we are teaching algorithmics to beginners we can't just ask them to re-code it themselves by reading one byte after an other.

According to our tests, the Scanner is using up to 200 Bytes to read ONE integer...

The exercise : 10 000 integers, which window of 100 consecutive integers has the maximal sum ?

The memory usage is small (you only need to memorize the last 100 integers) but between a classical version with "Scanner / nextInt()" and the manual version (see below) we can see a difference of 2.5 Mb in memory.

2.5 Mb to read 10 000 integers ==> 200 Bytes to read one integer ??

Is there any easy solution that one could explain to a beginner or is the following function (or similar) the way to go ?


Our test-function to read integers much faster while using much less memory :

public static int read_int() throws IOException
   {
     int number = 0;
     int signe = 1;

     int byteRead = System.in.read();
     while (byteRead != '-'  && ((byteRead < '0') || ('9' < byteRead)))
       byteRead = System.in.read();
     if (byteRead == '-')
     {
       signe = -1;
       byteRead = System.in.read();
     }
     while (('0' <= byteRead) && (byteRead <= '9'))
     {
        number *= 10;
        number += byteRead - '0';
        byteRead = System.in.read();
     }
     return signe*number;
   }


Code using Scanner, as requested :

import java.util.Scanner;

class Main {
   public static void main(String[] args) {
      Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
      int nbValues = sc.nextInt();
      int widthWindow = sc.nextInt();

      int values[] = new int[widthWindow];

      int sumValues = 0;
      for (int idValue = 0; idValue < widthWindow; idValue++)
      {
         values[idValue] = sc.nextInt();
         sumValues += values[idValue];
      }

      int maximum = sumValues;
      for (int idValue = widthWindow; idValue < nbValues; idValue++)
      {
         sumValues -= values[ idValue % widthWindow ];
         values[ idValue % widthWindow ] = sc.nextInt();

         sumValues += values[ idValue % widthWindow ];
         if (maximum < sumValues)
            maximum = sumValues;
      }
      System.out.println(maximum);
   }

}

As requested, memory used as a fonction of the number of integers :

  • 10,000 : 2.5Mb
  • 20,000 : 5Mb
  • 50,000 : 15Mb
  • 100,000 : 30Mb
  • 200,000 : 50Mb
  • 300,000 : 75Mb
share|improve this question
1  
Can you show example code of how you're using Scanner? – rsp Nov 15 '11 at 11:57
    
If you change to 100,000 integers, does the memory usage go up 25mb? – artbristol Nov 15 '11 at 12:28
    
Question updated : yes, it needs 25 Mb ! – Loïc Février Nov 29 '11 at 13:39

This is the code for nextInt() from Scanner

    public int nextInt(int radix) {
    // Check cached result
    if ((typeCache != null) && (typeCache instanceof Integer)
    && this.radix == radix) {
        int val = ((Integer)typeCache).intValue();
        useTypeCache();
        return val;
    }
    setRadix(radix);
    clearCaches();
    // Search for next int
    try {
        String s = next(integerPattern());
        if (matcher.group(SIMPLE_GROUP_INDEX) == null)
            s = processIntegerToken(s);
        return Integer.parseInt(s, radix);
    } catch (NumberFormatException nfe) {
        position = matcher.start(); // don't skip bad token
        throw new InputMismatchException(nfe.getMessage());
    }
}

As you can see, it is radix and sign aware, uses caching etc. So the additional memory use is all from functionality designed to improve the efficiency of the Scanner.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I can understand but why isn't the GC able to clean it and reduce the memory footprint ? With our function, we can read the 300,000 integers with 500 Kb of memory. – Loïc Février Nov 29 '11 at 13:41
    
So derive your own FastScanner and override nextInt. Thanks for pointing out the inefficiency of java.util.Scanner. – Joop Eggen Nov 29 '11 at 14:29
    
@Joop Eggen : I was going to do that but my question was : is there an other way in Java (without modifications) to read multiple integers with an easy code (we are targetting beginners) and a small memory footprint ? I'm not at all a Java expert... – Loïc Février Nov 29 '11 at 15:07
    
Sorry there is no duplicate way to my knowledge. Assuming you want your input file as text, you could place every number on its own line, and do a BufferedReader loop with Integer.parseInt. One would still feel inclined to make some Scanner wrapper class. – Joop Eggen Nov 30 '11 at 9:40

You could read all values into the array, and then start summing over the array.

While reading the array, you would still need that much memory, but after reading, it would be free for other purposes.

The structure of your code would benefit, imho, because now you could use a different source for your numbers - for example util.Random, and still search the array for the biggest sum, or search the same array for different sequence lengths, without rereading the input.

BTW: I had a hard time reading the code, because:

  • value/values/sumValues/nb_values - (why not maximumValues)? - all variables are values so this doesn't help understanding.
  • loops are normally indexed wiht i and j or n. Value is misleading
  • length_sequence is misleading too. sequence length is meant, but everybody would just use 'length', since there is no abiguity to other lengths.
  • You use long names for trivial things, but a cryptic abbrevation for a not so trivial one. I read your problem-description and code, and don't know what your code does: What do you have meant by nb_values. Non-Blocking? Null-Byte? Nearby? What is it?

My first impression was, that for a sequence of Ints:

3 9 2 4 6 4 3 2 4 4 5 6 9 3 2 1 9 9 9

you would search for a sequence of length 3 up to the 9th value (not counting 3 and 9 itselfs) and search for the maximum (2+4+6), (4+6+4), ... (4+4+5), but the result is 34. You add the first 9 values.

Suggestion:

import java.util.Scanner;

class MaxChunk {

   int chunksize;

   public int[] readValues () {
      Scanner sc = new Scanner (System.in);
      chunksize = sc.nextInt ();
      int length = sc.nextInt ();
      int values[] = new int [length];
      for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
      {
         values[i] = sc.nextInt();
      }   
      return values;
   }

   public int calc (int values[]) {
      int sum = 0;
      for (int i = 0; i < chunksize; i++)
      {
         sum += values[i];
      }

      int maximum = sum;

      for (int j = chunksize; j < values.length; j++)
      {
         sum -= values [j - chunksize];
         sum += values [j];
         if (maximum < sum)
             maximum = sum;
      }
      return maximum;  
   }

   public static void main (String[] args) {
      MaxChunk maxChunk = new MaxChunk ();
      int values[] = maxChunk.readValues ();
      System.out.println (maxChunk.calc (values));
   }
}

echo "3 9 2 4 6 4 3 2 4 4 5 6 9 3 2 1 9 9" | java MaxChunk

Yields 14.

share|improve this answer
    
The code isn't mine (it does not respect our conventions). "nb_values" means here "number of values". I've edited it with better variable names. The purpose of the exercise is to use as few memory as possible (we want an array of length chunksize, no more), so having it freed afterwards does not help. – Loïc Février Nov 29 '11 at 15:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

We finally decided to re-write (part of) the Scanner class. This way we only need to include our Scanner instead of the Java's one and the rest of the code remains the same. We don't have any memory problem anymore and the programs are 20 times faster.

The code below is from Christoph Dürr, one of my colleague :

import java.io.BufferedInputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;

class Locale {
   final static int US=0;
}

public class Scanner {
   private BufferedInputStream in;

   int c;

   boolean atBeginningOfLine;

   public Scanner(InputStream stream) {
      in = new BufferedInputStream(stream);
      try {
         atBeginningOfLine = true;
         c  = (char)in.read();
      } catch (IOException e) {
         c  = -1;
      }
   }

   public boolean hasNext() {
      if (!atBeginningOfLine) 
         throw new Error("hasNext only works "+
         "after a call to nextLine");
      return c != -1;
   }

   public String next() {
      StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
      atBeginningOfLine = false;
      try {
         while (c <= ' ') {
            c = in.read();
         } 
         while (c > ' ') {
            sb.append((char)c);
            c = in.read();
         }
      } catch (IOException e) {
         c = -1;
         return "";
      }
      return sb.toString();
   }

   public String nextLine() {
      StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
      atBeginningOfLine = true;
      try {
         while (c != '\n') {
            sb.append((char)c);
            c = in.read();
         }
         c = in.read();
      } catch (IOException e) {
         c = -1;
         return "";
      }
      return sb.toString();   
   }

   public int nextInt() {
      String s = next();
      try {
         return Integer.parseInt(s);
      } catch (NumberFormatException e) {
         return 0; //throw new Error("Malformed number " + s);
      }
   }

   public double nextDouble() {
      return new Double(next());
   }

   public long nextLong() {
      return Long.parseLong(next());
   } 

   public void useLocale(int l) {}
}

It is possible to be even faster by integrated the code in my question where we are "building" numbers by reading caracter after caracter.

share|improve this answer

I came across this question when investigating severe memory bloat in an Android app I'm developing.

Android has a tool to log all allocations.

It turns out that for parsing just a single nextDouble() call, Java makes 128 allocations. The top 8 are over 1000 bytes, the largest one is 4102 bytes(!)

Needless to say, this is completely unusable. We're struggling to keep battery drain low, this really doesn't help.

I'll try to use the replacement Scanner code that has been posted, thanks!

Here's the evidence:

4047    4102    char[]  13      java.lang.AbstractStringBuilder enlargeBuffer   
4045    3070    char[]  13      java.lang.String        <init>  
4085    2834    char[]  13      java.lang.AbstractStringBuilder enlargeBuffer   
4048    2738    char[]  13      java.lang.AbstractStringBuilder enlargeBuffer   
4099    1892    char[]  13      java.lang.AbstractStringBuilder enlargeBuffer   
4108    1264    char[]  13      java.lang.AbstractStringBuilder enlargeBuffer   
4118    1222    char[]  13      java.lang.AbstractStringBuilder enlargeBuffer   
4041    1128    int[]   13      java.util.regex.Matcher usePattern  
[...]

The second column is the Allocation Size (presumably in bytes, though the Android Device Monitor doesn't specify that).

Bottom line: Don't use Scanner unless you have lots of power and CPU to spare.

share|improve this answer

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