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I am using mongodb with the official c# driver.

I am using Guids as Id field for my objects. I don't want to introduce a dependency on the mongodb bson classes so I am not using ObjectId in my domain layer.

Is it possible to instruct mongodb to insert a creation timestamp into objects that I insert into the datastore?

Example:

public class Foo
{
    public Guid Id {get;set;}
    public DateTime CreatedOn {get;set;}
}

Using mongodb idGenerators I can get the Guids generated upon insert. I know ObjectId has the timestamp included but as mentioned I wouldn't want my class to look like this

public class Foo
{
    public ObjectId Id { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreatedOn {get { return Id.CreationTime;}}
}

Anyone got any ideas?

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Could you explain your choice for not using the bson class ? –  kamaradclimber Nov 15 '11 at 14:01
1  
You could say I'm trying to keep my domain layer "pure". What I mean by that is that I don't want any dependencies on third party libs (other than .NET) in my domain layer. So I can freely move the domain layer between persistence technologies. If I include the ObjectId type then I cannot do that without some effort. –  JB. Nov 16 '11 at 8:34
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can have an _id which is itself a document :

in json : { _id : {guid : ...., createdOn : ....} , field1 : ..., field2:....}

You just have to modify your idGenerator to have this behavior.

I recommend, however, that you really re-consider to use ObjectId.

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Despite what I have said with my comment I may just use ObjectId for simplicity (not sure yet). However, I am still surprised that in order to get a auto-generated timestamp from the db I have to use the Id type. –  JB. Nov 16 '11 at 8:36
    
If you want to have a timestamp you can generate it from the code. As I said –  kamaradclimber Nov 16 '11 at 15:55
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Is it important that it's the inserted timestamp and not the object's created timestamp? If not then do it in the constructor of the class. Or even better, a base class for your class(es).

public abstract class BaseClass
{
    [BsonId]
    public Guid Id {get;set;}
    public DateTime CreatedOn {get;set;}

    protected BaseClass()
    {
        Guid = new Guid();
        CreatedOn = new DateTime.UtcNow;
    }
}
public class Foo : BaseClass
{

}

Is this something you can use for it?

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Sorry if the code dosn't actually compile, I'm not at my dev computer atm. –  Paw Baltzersen Nov 21 '11 at 10:23
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If you're trying to make your domain layer pure and free of persistence concerns, then it makes sense to populate the creation date yourself in the domain layer, when deciding to create an entity, instead of relying on the database technology to put in a server timestamp.

This makes "creation date" a logical domain concept rather than the DB's concept of "timestamp when first stored in DB". The two can differ e.g. in cases of migrating data (but keeping the timestamp), deferring execution (e.g. in jobs), etc.

It also creates a healthy separation between "physical timestamp" and "logical timestamp" which you can further exploit during testing/mocking (e.g. you could have a test that says "do X, then change the logical time to 2 days in the future, then assert Y").

Finally, it forces you to think of what the creation date means in your domain layer instead of blindly assuming that it will be correct.

All this being said, if you insist on having it in MongoDB you can have a mapping that creates an ObjectID into some kind of hidden field (e.g. an explicitly-implemented interface) at insert time, and extracts its timestamp into the CreationDate field at read time.

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