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The following code is pretty self-explanatory and my question is very simple :
Why is AsyncCallback method "HandleConnect" not propagating exception to the "Connect" method
and how to propagate it ?

    public void Connect(IPEndPoint endpoint, IVfxIpcSession session)
    {
        try 
        {  
          ipcState.IpcSocket.BeginConnect(ipcState.IpcEndpoint, HandleConnect, ipcState);  
        }

        catch(Exception x) 
        { 
          ManageException(x.ToString()); //Never Caught, though "HandleConnect" blows a SocketException
        }
    }

    private void HandleConnect(IAsyncResult ar) 
    {
      // SocketException blows here, no propagation to method above is made. 
      // Initially there was a try/catch block that hided it and this is NOT GOOD AT ALL 
      // as I NEED TO KNOW when something goes wrong here.
       ipcState.IpcSocket.EndConnect(ar);  
    }


1 - I guess this is pretty normal behavior. But I would appreciate a comprehensive explanation of why is this happening this way and what happens exactly behind the hoods.

2 - Is there any (quick and simple) way to propagate the exception through my app ?

forewarning I know many dudes in here are very critical and I anticipate the comment "Why don't you put the ManageException directly in the "HandleConnect" Method. Well, to make a long story short, let's just say "I got my reasons" lol. I just posted a code sample here and I want to propagate this exception way further than that and do much more stuff than showed in other places in the "N-upper" code.

EDIT
As an aswer to a comment, I also tried this previously indeed, with no luck :

    private void HandleConnect(IAsyncResult ar) 
    {          
        try 
        {
          ipcState.IpcSocket.EndConnect(ar);  
        }

        catch(Exception x) 
        { 
          throw x; // Exception Blows here. It is NOT propagated.
        }
    }

My Solution : I ended up putting an Event Handler to whom every concerned code logic subscribes.
This way the exception is not just swallowed down nor just blows, but a notification is broadcasted.

 public event EventHandler<MyEventArgs> EventDispatch;
 private void HandleConnect(IAsyncResult ar) 
    {          
        try 
        {
          ipcState.IpcSocket.EndConnect(ar);  
        }

        catch(Exception x) 
        {               
           if (EventDispatch!= null)
           {
               EventDispatch(this, args);
           }
        }
    }

  //Priorly, I push subscriptions like that : 

  tcpConnector.EventDispatch += tcpConnector_EventDispatch;

  public void tcpConnector_EventDispatch(object sender, VfxTcpConnectorEventArgs args)
  {
        //Notify third parties, manage exception, etc.
  }

This is a little bit crooked, but it works fine

share|improve this question
    
Only unhandled exceptions propagate. If it's caught, it's handled. You need something like throw x to force it to continue propagating after catching and processing it at one level. –  mellamokb Nov 15 '11 at 13:07
1  
@mellamokb: But where should that thrown exception be handled? Method HandleConnect is running on a different thread. –  Fischermaen Nov 15 '11 at 13:10
    
@mellamokb : See edit –  Mehdi LAMRANI Nov 15 '11 at 13:13
    
There is no 'propagation', there is no code to propagate the exception to. Your Connect() method has stopped running a long time ago. You need to handle the exception if you want to prevent your program from terminating. Swallow ObjectDisposedException, raised when your main program closes the socket. Anything else should put your program in a "connection unavailable" state. –  Hans Passant Nov 15 '11 at 13:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you use BeginConnect the connection is done asynchronously. You get the following chain of events:

  1. Connect "posts" a request to connect through BeginConnect.
  2. Connect method returns.
  3. The connection is done in the background.
  4. HandleConnect is called by the framework with the result of the connect.

When you reach step number 4, Connect has already returned so that try-catch block isn't active any more. This is the behavior you get when using asynchronous implementations.

The only reason you would have an exception caught in Connect is if BeginConnect fails to initiate the background connection task. This could e.g. be if BeginConnect validates the supplied arguments before initiating the background operation and throws an exception if they are not correct.

You can use the AppDomain.UnhandledException event to catch any unhandled exceptions in a central place. Once the exception reaches that level any form of recovery is probably hard to achieve, since the exception could be from anywhere. If you have a recovery method - catch the exception as close to the origin as possible. If you only log/inform the user - catching centrally in once place is often better.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Perfect. This is exactly what I was suspecting. But I needed a thorough and robust confirmation. What about the 2nd point now ? :-) –  Mehdi LAMRANI Nov 15 '11 at 13:16
    
@MikaJacobi only if you do not use an ASync method, because your main app/thread has to wait before the ASync thread is finished if you want to propogate, thus you either need your own wait handler/syncing method or you need to use .connect instead of async –  Daan Timmer Nov 15 '11 at 13:25
    
See My solution edit for point 2 –  Mehdi LAMRANI Nov 15 '11 at 13:39
    
I marked this as answered even though that was only half my query as I had 2 questions :-) –  Mehdi LAMRANI Nov 16 '11 at 18:57

One option is to use AsyncWaitHandle with your existing code.

For better exception handling, you would have to either use event based programming model or modify your code to use BackgroundWorker component which supports reporting error from the worker thread to the main thread.

There are some discussions and articles present on this topic at following links:

http://openmymind.net/2011/7/14/Error-Handling-In-Asynchronous-Code-With-Callbacks/

MSDN Sample: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms228978.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, Thank you. Event based programming was definitely a good idea –  Mehdi LAMRANI Nov 16 '11 at 18:56

Further to what Anders has pointed out, it is probably a good idea to read this:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2e08f6yc.aspx

and look into how you can pass a callback method into the asynchronous call to BeginConnect (if one does exist) using something like an AsyncCallback where you can retrieve the delegate and call EndInvoke within a try catch block.

E.g.:

    public void
    CallbackMethod
        (IAsyncResult AR)
    {
        // Retrieve the delegate
        MyDelegate ThisDelegate =
            (MyDelegate)AR.AsyncState;

        try
        {
            Int32 Ret = ThisDelegate.EndInvoke(AR);
        } // End try
        catch (Exception Ex)
        {
            ReportException(Ex);
        } // End try/catch
    } // End CallbackMethod
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I ended up using delegates indeed but in a much simpler and straightforward fashion (See my solution edit) –  Mehdi LAMRANI Nov 16 '11 at 18:55

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