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I use jquery and the jquery validate plugin for my form.

If the input_17 has content length > 1, it is required to select a file input_1_67. That works.

        input_17: {
        required: function(element) {
            return $("#input_1_67").val().length > 1
        }
    }

Now, if the user has select a file i like to return a "valid" class to the input_17. Any ideas how i can get this class? And: i like to add this class only if

$("#input_1_67").val().length > 1

and a file is select.

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The code in the answer to this question should help you as well. –  Shadow Wizard Nov 15 '11 at 13:24

3 Answers 3

If you are using the jQuery validator plugin then you shouldn't have to add any classes to your inputs, the validator does this for you.

As far as I am aware, the browser does not let you read the file path, or set it for that matter. The only thing you will be able to get is the file name. This is a security restriction to prevent unauthorized file access. You can get the filename by getting the value. Once you have this you can do further validation on the file type (but unreliable on the client). If you want to add a custom rule to the validator to check file type then you can do this:

jQuery.validator.addMethod("filetype", function(value, element) {
    var types = ['jpeg', 'png', 'gif'],
        ext = value.replace(/.*[.]/, '').toLowerCase();

    if (types.indexOf(ext) !== -1) {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}, 'Insert invalid message here');

To make the above a bit more reusable, take the array of file types out of the function and pass them in as a parameter to the function. See this link: http://docs.jquery.com/Plugins/Validation/Validator/addMethod#namemethodmessage

Secondly, when you click on a file input or click the "browse" button, a file dialog opens. So the only thing that should ever be in the input is a file name.

With these assumptions, the validity of the field can be a simple check to see if something is there, which is what you are already doing.

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You could simply bind the change event to the desired input, i.e:

$('#input_1_67').change(function(){
    $(this).addClass('valid');
});
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$('#input_1_67').change(function(){
    if($("#input_1_67").val().length > 1)
        $("#input_17").addClass('valid');
    else
        $("#input_17").removeClass('valid');
    }
});

Also, if you are using jquery validator, you may want to try

$('#input_1_67').change(function(){
    $("#input_17").valid();
});

This will trigger validator method (as input_17 validity depends on input_1_67, it should be validated whenever input_1_67 changes) and the plugin will set the css class automatically.

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+1 because someone went around downvoting our responses for no clear reason. –  maxedison Mar 7 '13 at 23:46

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