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I'm a big fan of keeping my code simple and trim so it can be re-usable, on thing i'm struggling with is using the data reader for different types of objects, I had it in a method and found there were problems with connections closed or being left open. SO I am being forced, for the mean time to copy and paste the code, which is something I hate!!! Is there any way I can scale this down so I can put it in a method and make it re-usable and nice?

ENT_AuctionBid ret = new ENT_AuctionBid();      

try
        {
            SqlParameter[] Params = new SqlParameter[]{ 
                    new SqlParameter("@ID", ID ) 
            };

            using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(this.ConnectionString))
            {
                using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("GetItem", conn))
                {
                    SqlDataReader reader;
                    command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

                    conn.Open();

                    command.Parameters.AddRange(Params);
                    reader = command.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.SingleRow);

                    while (reader.HasRows)
                    {
                        while (reader.Read())
                        {
            // 
                            ret = this.Convert(reader);
                        }

                        reader.NextResult();
                    }

                    reader.Close();
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {

        }  
return ret;
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8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should use SQLDataAdapter.
Here's a nice example on how to use it: http://www.dotnetperls.com/sqldataadapter

Also, you might want to consider switching to Entity Framework, it will make your data access much, much easier, but might be complicated in an existing project.

share|improve this answer
    
SqlDataAdapter has quite a bit of overhead - which is really not needed here... so I would vote against that. EF might be on option –  marc_s Nov 15 '11 at 14:46
    
I switched to the Entity Framework, Fantastic! –  Funky Nov 22 '11 at 10:53

You can make it using a lot less lines:

// Skipped creating temp variable
try {
   using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(this.ConnectionString))
   using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("GetItem", conn) { CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure} ) {

      command.Parameters.AddWithValue(@ID, ID);
      conn.Open();

      // reader is IDisposable, you can use using
      using (var reader = command.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.SingleRow)) {
          // Skipped parsing multiple result sets, you return after the first
          // otherwise there's no point using SingleRow 
          // If nothing is read, return default value
          return reader.Read() ? this.Convert(reader) : new ENT_AuctionBid();
      }
   }
}
catch (Exception ex) {
    // Handle your exception here
}  
// Return default value for error
return new ENT_AuctionBid();

All connections are closed using this code (because using is used). No unneeded loops are created, becuase you only expect a single row. And the temporary variable is not needed, so the abondend object is not created, only when it is used it is created.

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This is a bit smaller:-

    try
        {

            using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(this.ConnectionString))
            {
                using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand("GetItem", conn))
                {
                    command.Paramaters.AddWithValue("@ID",ID);
                    command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

                    conn.Open();

                    reader = command.ExecuteReader();

                    while (reader.Read())
                    {

            // 
                            ret = this.Convert(reader);

                    }

                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {

        }  
share|improve this answer

Create helper methods for creating and returning an object of type SqlCommand. Pass a connection object to this helper method as well as stored procedure name and parameters list (if any). If you have different objects that are created from the data reader, pass the data reader to a constructor and let it generate an object based on that data. As for closing the connection you should always have try...catch...finally. In the finally section close the connection.

share|improve this answer
    
the using will call dispose which will close the connection. –  Ross Dargan Nov 15 '11 at 14:15
    
True. It's just that @Funky said he had problems with connection staying open in some parts. Personally I use try..catch..finally instead of using() because my connections are also created by a helper method as I usually have to do certain logging in the background. Then there is a close connection helper method which does some checks before the connection is closed and it is placed in the finally block. –  Husein Roncevic Nov 15 '11 at 14:27

In my projects i usually solve this problem creating an utility class that contains all the methods to access to the DB and manage inside all the stuff related to the db connection and the adapter. For example a class called DBSql which contains a connection (SqlConnection connection;) as private member and the following methods:

//execute the query passed to the function
public System.Data.DataSet ExecuteQuery(string query)
//returns if a query returns rows or not
public bool HasRows(string query)
//execute commands like update/insert/etc...
public int ExcuteNonQuery(string sql)

In my class, you just pass a string and the class initialize the various DataAdapter and Command to execute it and return a dataset. Obiously you can complicate it to manage parameters/transaction and everything else. In this way you are sure that the connection and the object are always handled the same way, and, hopefully, in a correct way.

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private delegate void CommandAction(Command command);

private static void ExecuteCommandAction(CommandAction commandAction)
{
  using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(this.ConnectionString))
  {
    using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(conn))
    {
      commandAction(command);
    }
  }
}

Which can be used like this:

SqlParameter[] Params = new SqlParameter[]{ new SqlParameter("@ID", ID ) };

ExecuteCommandAction(command =>
{
  command.CommandText = "GetItem";
  command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

  command.Parameters.AddRange(Params);

  SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.SingleRow);

  while (reader.HasRows)
  {
    while (reader.Read())
    {
       ret = this.Convert(reader);
    }

    reader.NextResult();
  }

  reader.Close();
});

You can also create an even more specialized delegate that handles readers specifically.

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You can use a utility file, such as SqlHelper.cs from Microsoft Data Access Application Block. Then all the code you need is this:

using (SqlDataReader sdr = SqlHelper.ExecuteReader(this.ConnectionString, "GetItem", ID))
  {
    while (sdr.Read())
    {
      ret = this .Convert(sdr);
    }
  }
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You could start using LINQ-to-SQL, which has it's own DataClass system in which you just drag-&-drop your database tables and stored procedures. Then you just have to create an instance at the top of your classes -- private MyCustomDataClass _db = new MyCustomDataClass(); and then you can just type in _db.<Here all datatables and SPROCs will appaer for you to choose>.

Example (from when all SPROCs are added to the DataClass)

private MyCustomDataClass _db = new MyCustomDataClass();

public void MethodToRunSPROC(string email, Guid userId)
{
    _db.MySPORC_AddEmailToUser(email, userId);
}
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