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How can I read a file and convert each line into a date?

Ok so I have a "holiday.txt" file that I intend to have Python read. In it, I want to have lines that say such things as:

11/24/11
11/25/11
12/25/11
12/31/11
1/1/12
5/28/12
7/4/12
9/3/12

etc. These are the holidays for my company. I want the program to read these, and convert them into date (?) objects, which can be modified by timedelta or compared to the dates that emails are going to be sent out. Basically I want to insure in my program that any dates listed here are not going to have emails sent on them (but that is something I will write, I just want to convert all dates to time objects)

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use datetime.strptime to convert the strings into datetime.datetime objects:

import datetime as dt
dates=[]
with open('holiday.txt','r') as f:
    dates=[dt.datetime.strptime(line.strip(),'%m/%d/%y')
           for line in f if line.strip()]

print(dates)
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See the Python datetime documentation

import time, datetime
time_format = "%m/%d/%y"

holidays = []
f = open('holiday.txt', 'r')
for line in f:
    date = datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp(time.mktime(time.strptime(line, time_format)))
    holidays.append(date)    
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1  
datetime has a strptime method, no need to use time. –  rplnt Nov 15 '11 at 14:32
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i always use

dateutil.parser.parse

since one does not need to enter the time format so you can just do

from dateutil.parser import parse as dateparser

inputfile = open(<filename>,'r')

[dateparser(line) for line in f]

and you do get a list of datetime.datetime objects

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The problem with "intelligent" software like that is that if your input has a mixture of date formats ("we 'cat' all the files we get from our world-wide subsidiaries"), the mess is not detected. –  John Machin Nov 15 '11 at 19:32
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