Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having trouble with a segmentation fault caused by the following line:

heapVec[currentsize] = *(new Node(d));

What am I doing wrong here?

#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class Node {
private:
    int data;
public:
    Node(int);
    // ~Node();
};

class Heap {
private:
    vector<Node> heapVec;
    int currentsize;
public:
    Heap();
    // ~Heap();
    void insert(int);
    void extractMin();
    void reduceKey();
};

Node::Node(int d) {
    data = d;
}

void Heap::insert(int d) {
    heapVec[currentsize] = *(new Node(d));
    currentsize++;
}

Heap::Heap() {
    // this is the default constructor
    currentsize = 0;
}

int main() {
    Heap *h = new Heap;
    h->insert(10);
}
share|improve this question
    
The code *(new Node(d)) is completly wrong. It allocate object of class Node, and forgot about the pointer. It's a definition of memory leak. You must change` vector<Node> heapVec;` to vector<Node*> heapVec; or use something like boost::ptr_vector<Node> heapVec;. –  Arpegius Nov 15 '11 at 14:46
    
Don't use a vector<Node*>. You will most likely end up with a memory leak, because you will have to manually delete every vector member. Just do, what Dani said below, and you're fine. –  Ben Nov 15 '11 at 14:52
    
+1 for a complete, minimal program that demonstrates the problem you are having. See sscce.org for reasons why that is valuable. –  Robᵩ Nov 15 '11 at 15:23
2  
Also, currentsize is redundant. Just use heapVec.size() when you want to know the current size. –  Robᵩ Nov 15 '11 at 15:26
    
@Rob: I don't really see how this is minimal... its can be reduced to like 3 lines. –  Dani Nov 15 '11 at 16:17
show 1 more comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

A vector doesn't grow automatically when you write out of its bounds using subscript operator. To insert to the end of the vector (increasing its size) use this:

heapVec.push_back(Node(d));

Also don't use *(new Node(d)), it won't segfault, but its a memory leak.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Before you access a vector by index you need to allocate space for it

 heapVec[currentsize] = *(new Node(d));

heapVec.resize(currentsize + 1) should do it. It will ensure that heapVec has at least currentsize + 1 elements and you can access currentsize.

One way to avoid this is by modifying your function. As you only are adding to the end of the vector.

void Heap::insert(int d) {
    heapVec.push_back( Node(d) );
    currentsize++;
}

Please note that you have vector<Node> and not vector<Node*> so you don't need the new call.

Also vector has a size() method so you don't need to duplicate it by having your own currentSize

share|improve this answer
    
I see what you mean but that's giving me the following: minheap.cpp:33: error: no matching function for call to ‘Node::Node()’ minheap.cpp:28: note: candidates are: Node::Node(int) minheap.cpp:8: note: Node::Node(const Node&) –  Daniel O'Connor Nov 15 '11 at 14:45
    
You need a default constructor for anything you put in a std::vector. –  Mike DeSimone Nov 15 '11 at 14:48
    
@DanielO'Connor: Of course, you need to define a default constructor for Node. Without one, you cannot use a std::vector of Nodes. –  Arne Nov 15 '11 at 14:50
add comment

First, you're writing outside the range of the vector, which is causing the segmentation fault. You need to either resize the vector to be large enough to contain it, or use push_back() to resize it for you.

Second, you have a memory leak - you're creating a Node with new for no good reason, then copying it into the vector, then losing the pointer and so never deleting the first object.

What you want is

heapVec.push_back(Node(d));

or in C++11

heapVec.emplace_back(d);

I would also get rid of your redundant currentsize variable and use heapVec.size() instead. Also, don't use new to create the local heap in main(); in general don't use new unless you really have to, and when you do, always use smart pointers or very carefully written code to make sure the object is deleted.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I am pretty sure that you got this error because you tried to write out of vector's boundaries. Don't use array syntax (although you're allowed) for operations on vector: in Heap::insert() use heapVec.push_back().

Another thing is that you should not bother using Node type if it contains only int member. Why not just having vector<int>?

You can simplify your class further. When you already have std::vector, your currentsize member is redundant (unnecessary) as vector::size() will tell you the current size of it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

What am I doing wrong here?

A few different things, including the bug that results in your crash. See my comments below.

#include <vector>

// Never, ever, say "using namespace std;" even if (especially if) your textbook says to.
// using namespace std;
using std::vector;

class Node {
private:
    int data;
public:
    // Prefer to define small functions in-class so that they are automatically inline
    // Prefer initialization list to assignment. This is mostly style in your case, but
    // does matter in more complex cases.
    Node(int d) : data(d) {}
    // ~Node();
};

class Heap {
private:
    vector<Node> heapVec;
    // int currentsize;  "currentsize" is redundant, and thus error-prone.
    // heapVec always knows what size it is, so just ask it whenever you need to know.
public:
    // In this trivial example, with currentsize gone, you don't need any constructor.
    // Heap();
    // ~Heap();
    void insert(int);
    void extractMin();
    void reduceKey();
};

void Heap::insert(int d) {
    // This is your crash bug -- std::vector::operator[] doesn't automatically extend
    // the size of the vector (unlike, say, std::map::operator[], which does).
    // Also, your use of "new" here is unconventional, and buggy. You have a memory leak.
    // It is possible to write perfectly useful C++ programs while never invoking "new"
    // directly.
    // heapVec[currentsize] = *(new Node(d));
    // currentsize++;

    // Instead, use std::vector::push_back() or std::vector::insert(), *and* don't call
    // new.
    heapVec.push_back(Node(d));
}


int main() {
    // In this example (and, I bet, in your real-world program), you don't need "new"
    Heap h;
    h.insert(10);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

There are two errors you are doing: The first is the problem you have, and it's that you insert into a specific place in heapVec without allocating memory for it. This is solved either by calling heapVec.reserve(...) in the Heap constructor, or by calling heapVec.push_back(Node(d)) in insert.

The other problem is that when inserting nodes into the vector, you allocate new node and get the contents of it, which will make a copy that is stored in the vector. But you don't store the actual allocated pointer, which means you have a memory leak. You should not allocate in this case.

share|improve this answer
2  
reserve() doesn't help, except to replace the segmentation fault with more subtle undefined behaviour - it's still illegal to access objects beyond the end of the array. You need to resize() before accessing them. –  Mike Seymour Nov 15 '11 at 14:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.