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I often read that unique_ptr would be preferred in most situations over shared_ptr because unique_ptr is non-copyable and has move semantics; shared_ptr would add an overhead due to copy and ref-counting;

But when I test unique_ptr in some situations, it appears it's noticably slower (in access) than its counterparts

For example, under gcc 4.5 :

edit : the print method doesn't print anything actually

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <memory>
#include <chrono>
#include <vector>

class Print{

public:
void print(){}

};

void test()
{
 typedef vector<shared_ptr<Print>> sh_vec;
 typedef vector<unique_ptr<Print>> u_vec;

 sh_vec shvec;
 u_vec  uvec;

 //can't use initializer_list with unique_ptr
 for (int var = 0; var < 100; ++var) {

    shared_ptr<Print> p(new Print());
    shvec.push_back(p);

    unique_ptr<Print> p1(new Print());
    uvec.push_back(move(p1));

  }

 //-------------test shared_ptr-------------------------
 auto time_sh_1 = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

 for (auto var = 0; var < 1000; ++var) 
 {
   for(auto it = shvec.begin(), end = shvec.end(); it!= end; ++it)
   {
     (*it)->print();
   }
 }

 auto time_sh_2 = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

 cout <<"test shared_ptr : "<< (time_sh_2 - time_sh_1).count() << " microseconds." << endl;

 //-------------test unique_ptr-------------------------
 auto time_u_1 = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

 for (auto var = 0; var < 1000; ++var) 
 {
   for(auto it = uvec.begin(), end = uvec.end(); it!= end; ++it)
   {
     (*it)->print();
   }
 }

 auto time_u_2 = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

 cout <<"test unique_ptr : "<< (time_u_2 - time_u_1).count() << " microseconds." << endl;

}

On average I get (g++ -O0) :

  • shared_ptr : 1480 microseconds
  • unique_ptr : 3350 microseconds

where does the difference come from ? is it explainable ?

share|improve this question
4  
What compiler flags are you using? And ... what does gprof show? –  Useless Nov 15 '11 at 15:00
3  
Are you compiling with or without optimizations? Profiling without optimization is useless. –  Luchian Grigore Nov 15 '11 at 15:02
3  
It's not noticeably different here: ideone.com/hmRK4 –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 15 '11 at 15:07
1  
Cannot reproduce. With optimizations, the program does nothing. I added a volatile int member increment to the print() function, and the unique_ptr performs better consistently now. –  Kerrek SB Nov 15 '11 at 15:23
1  
@nos indeed with an -O2 optimization, both tests last 1 microsecond –  codablank1 Nov 15 '11 at 15:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

All you did in the timed blocks is access them. That won't involve any additional overhead at all. The increased time probably comes from the console output scrolling. You can never, ever do I/O in a timed benchmark.

And if you want to test the overhead of ref counting, then actually do some ref counting. How is the increased time for construction, destruction, assignment and other mutating operations of shared_ptr going to factor in to your time at all if you never mutate shared_ptr?

Edit: If there's no I/O then where are the compiler optimizations? They should have nuked the whole thing. Even ideone junked the lot.

share|improve this answer
    
When you say you can't do I/O in a timed benchmark, I don't see the I/O occurring inside the for-loop that is being timed ... wouldn't a benchmark need to at some point output its results? –  Jason Nov 15 '11 at 15:10
    
In defense of the OP: print does nothing... –  Matthieu M. Nov 15 '11 at 15:10
    
I assumed that the /*print*/ comment actually contained some printing. –  Puppy Nov 15 '11 at 15:11
1  
@DeadMG: we are talking microseconds and the iteration takes place 1000 times. So that's about 30 nano seconds per access. –  Matthieu M. Nov 15 '11 at 15:19
1  
To be honest, with some modifications to the test, I'm also seeing that access to unique_ptr's value is consistently almost twice slower (with gcc 4.4.1 MinGW). - As far as I can see, "you should be doing some ref-counting" completely misses what's asked. The question is precisely about the unexpected slowness of access via unique_ptr. Feel welcome to recommend better profiling techniques, but don't recommend just timing something different instead. –  UncleBens Nov 15 '11 at 16:57

UPDATED on Jan 01, 2014

I know this question is pretty old, but the results are still valid on G++ 4.7.0 and libstdc++ 4.7. So, I tried to find out the reason.

What you're benchmarking here is the dereferencing performance using -O0 and, looking at the implementation of unique_ptr and shared_ptr, your results are actually correct.

unique_ptr stores the pointer and the deleter in a ::std::tuple, while shared_ptr stores a naked pointer handle directly. So, when you dereference the pointer (using *, ->, or get) you have an extra call to ::std::get<0>() in unique_ptr. In contrast, shared_ptr directly returns the pointer. On gcc-4.7 even when optimized and inlined, ::std::get<0>() is a bit slower than the direct pointer.. When optimized and inlined, gcc-4.8.1 fully omits the overhead of ::std::get<0>(). On my machine, when compiled with -O3, the compiler generates exactly the same assembly code, which means they are literally the same.

All in all, using the current implementation, shared_ptr is slower on creation, moving, copying and reference counting, but equally as fast *on dereferencing*.

NOTE: print() is empty in the question and the compiler omits the loops when optimized. So, I slightly changed the code to correctly observe the optimization results:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <memory>
#include <chrono>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

class Print {
 public:
  void print() { i++; }

  int i{ 0 };
};

void test() {
  typedef vector<shared_ptr<Print>> sh_vec;
  typedef vector<unique_ptr<Print>> u_vec;

  sh_vec shvec;
  u_vec uvec;

  // can't use initializer_list with unique_ptr
  for (int var = 0; var < 100; ++var) {
    shvec.push_back(make_shared<Print>());
    uvec.emplace_back(new Print());
  }

  //-------------test shared_ptr-------------------------
  auto time_sh_1 = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

  for (auto var = 0; var < 1000; ++var) {
    for (auto it = shvec.begin(), end = shvec.end(); it != end; ++it) {
      (*it)->print();
    }
  }

  auto time_sh_2 = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

  cout << "test shared_ptr : " << (time_sh_2 - time_sh_1).count()
       << " microseconds." << endl;

  //-------------test unique_ptr-------------------------
  auto time_u_1 = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

  for (auto var = 0; var < 1000; ++var) {
    for (auto it = uvec.begin(), end = uvec.end(); it != end; ++it) {
      (*it)->print();
    }
  }

  auto time_u_2 = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

  cout << "test unique_ptr : " << (time_u_2 - time_u_1).count()
       << " microseconds." << endl;
}

int main() { test(); }

NOTE: That is not a fundamental problem and can be easily fixed by discarding the use of ::std::tuple in current libstdc++ implementation.

share|improve this answer
2  
I am not convinced by your ::std::get<0>() argument. The compiler has all information at hand to completely eliminate everything else of the call than the actual dereferencing. Whether it does it or not in practise may be a different question... –  ingomueller.net May 7 '13 at 7:11
1  
This is bollocks. It can be easily fixed by enabling optimisations in the compiler. The library has no reason to change behaviour. People should stop complaining that their unoptimised code is slow. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 28 '13 at 12:40
2  
Again, performance benchmark with -O0 flag is meaningless. –  Eonil Dec 17 '13 at 3:20
    
@ingomueller.net On gcc-4.8.1 (unlike 4.7.0), the compiler omits all overheads of std::get and generates exactly the same assembly code for both cases. I updated the answer to reflect that. –  Soheil Hassas Yeganeh Jan 1 '14 at 23:59

You're not testing anything useful here.

What you are talking about: copy

What you are testing: iteration

If you want to test copy, you actually need to perform a copy. Both smart pointers should have similar performance when it comes to reading, because good shared_ptr implementations will keep a local copy of the object pointed to.

EDIT:

Regarding the new elements:

It's not even worth talking about speed when using debug code, in general. If you care about performance, you will use release code (-O2 in general) and thus that's what should be measured, as there can be significant differences between debug and release code. Most notably, inlining of template code can seriously decrease the execution time.

Regarding the benchmark:

  • I would add another round of measures: naked pointers. Normally, unique_ptr and naked pointers should have the same performance, it would be worth checking it, and it need not necessarily be true in debug mode.
  • You might want to "interleave" the execution of the two batches or if you cannot, take the average of each among several runs. As it is, if the computer slows down during the end of the benchmark, only the unique_ptr batch will be affected which will perturbate the measure.

You might be interested in learning more from Neil: The Joy of Benchmarks, it's not a definitive guide, but it's quite interesting. Especially the part about forcing side-effects to avoid dead-code removal ;)

Also, be careful about how you measure. The resolution of your clock might be less precise than what it appears to be. If the clock is refreshed only every 15us for example, then any measure around 15us is suspicious. It might be an issue when measuring release code (you might need to add a few turns to the loop).

share|improve this answer
    
I know , my question is ill-formed but I can't explain the difference between both of them –  codablank1 Nov 15 '11 at 15:12
    
@codablank1: I don't have a compiler at hand that can compile your code sample (lack of C++11 support...) so I cannot say. If you can inspect the Intermediate Representation or the assembly output you may be able to spot the difference. No idea here... especially since my hunch would be that unique_ptr ought to be faster as it's smaller, though it may not show much on only 100 items. –  Matthieu M. Nov 15 '11 at 15:23
    
As far as I can see the asker is testing the right thing. Assume the usage pattern is fill vector once, access many times. The asker is worried about unique_ptr appearing to be worse for the latter. –  UncleBens Nov 15 '11 at 17:17
    
@UncleBens: it seems the question changed substantially since I answered. The original question didn't mention that access was the concern and only talked about copying/moving before proposing the code. –  Matthieu M. Nov 16 '11 at 7:15
    
Not really, IMO. It seems that you take the question to be: how to create a benchmark which demonstrates the superiority of unique_ptr? - BTW, I made those test separately compilable and checked the assembly. The only difference in the inner loop came from the difference in size between the pointers. The access itself was completely inlined in both cases. Yet, unique_ptr test kept being almost 2 times slower. Some subtly difference in the surrounding assembly? –  UncleBens Nov 16 '11 at 7:57

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