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I'm using Mathematica to work with a large array of website files, which I've mirrored onto my own system. They are spread across several hundred directories, with tons of sub-directories. So for example, I have:

/users/me/test/directory1
/users/me/test/directory1/subdirectory2 [times a hundred]
/users/me/test/directory2
/users/me/test/directory2/subdirectory5 [etc. etc.]

What I need to do is to go into each directory, Import[] all the HTML files as Plaintext, and then put them in another directory elsewhere on my system named after 'directory1'. So far, with Do[] loops I have been able to do a rough version: the best case I have right now, however, is dumping the ".txt" files in the original directory, which isn't an ideal solution as they're still spread all over my system.

To find my files, I use directoryfiles = FileNames["*.htm*", {"*"}, Infinity];

Some additional vexing problems:

(1) Duplicates: Is there a way for Mathematica to deal with duplicates - i.e. if we run into another index_en.html can it be renamed as index_en_1.html?

(2) Directories: Because of all the directories, unless I use Mathematica to constantly SetDirectory and CreateDirectory over and over again, it keeps running into trouble.

This all seems a bit confusing. Basically, is there an efficient way for Mathematica to find a ton of HTML files spread across hundreds of directories/subdirectories, Import them as plaintext, and export them somewhere else [it's important for me to know they came from directory1, but that's it].

-- edited for clarity below --

Here is the code that I currently have:

SetDirectory[
  "/users/me/web/"];
dirlist = FileNames[];
directoryPrefix = 
  "/users/me/web/";
plainHTMLBucket = "";
Do[
  directory = directoryPrefix <> dirname;
  exportPrefix = 
   "/users/me/desktop/bucket/";
  SetDirectory[directory];
  allFiles = FileNames["*.htm*", {"*"}, Infinity];
  plainHTMLBucket = "";
  Do[
   plainHTML = Import[filename, "Plaintext"];
   plainHTMLBucket = AppendTo[plainHTMLBucket, plainHTML];
   , {filename, allFiles}];
  Export[exportPrefix <> dirname <> ".txt", plainHTMLBucket];
  Print["We Have Reached Here"];
  , {dirname, dirlist}];

What's wrong with it from my perspective? Besides being messy, it's my workaround: I would much rather have all the files separated rather than one big one - i.e. take each import and export as a separate file, but in a directory called 'directory1' albeit somewhere else. The problem is when it comes to mirroring these directories (the directories don't exist, but I am having trouble using CreateDirectory[] to dynamically do so).

My apologies for the confusion here - I know it shows with this question..

share|improve this question
    
When you say "plain text", do you mean strip out all the tags and display only the text that would be displayed in a browser? Or do you mean read the contents of a file and write it out as a *.txt file? –  r.m. Nov 15 '11 at 16:38
    
I mean importing is as "Plaintext" - displaying the text that would be displayed in a browser (keeping accents for example, instead of appearing as [eacoute]) –  programming_historian Nov 15 '11 at 16:48
1  
Ian, are you doing anything to the files? What do you mean by "converting"? If you just want to recursively move files from one place to another then Mathematica is the wrong tool. A simple shell script will probably do, and even if you have some weird stuff you want to check, like duplicates etc., you'll probably do much better using python or perl. –  Timo Nov 15 '11 at 17:12
2  
btw, @ian.milligan Your account here and on Area51 are not associated. If you do so, it will count more towards commitment. –  r.m. Nov 15 '11 at 18:06
1  
It's considered better to say Import than Import[]. : ) –  Andrew MacFie Nov 16 '11 at 17:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The following code might do the trick:

mapFileNames[source_, filenames_, target_] :=
  Module[{depth = FileNameDepth[source]}
  , FileNameJoin[{target, FileNameDrop[#, depth]}]& /@ filenames
  ]

htmlTreeToPlainText[source_, target_] :=
  Module[{htmlFiles, textFiles, targetDirs}
  , htmlFiles = FileNames["*.html", source, Infinity]
  ; textFiles = StringReplace[
                  mapFileNames[source, htmlFiles, target]
                  , f__~~".html"~~EndOfString :> f~~".txt"
                  ]
  ; targetDirs = DeleteDuplicates[FileNameDrop[#, -1]& /@ textFiles]
  ; If[FileExistsQ[target], DeleteDirectory[target, DeleteContents -> True]]
  ; Scan[CreateDirectory[#, CreateIntermediateDirectories -> True]&, targetDirs]
  ; Scan[
      Export[#[[2]], Import[#[[1]], "Plaintext"], "Text"] &
    , Transpose[{htmlFiles, textFiles}]
    ]
  ]

Example use (warning: the target directory will be deleted first!):

htmlTreeToPlainText["/users/me/web", "/users/me/desktop/bucket"]

How It Works

The various Mathematica FileName... functions are helpful in this context. First, we start by defining the helper function mapFileNames that takes a source directory, a list of file names that lie within the source directory, and a target directory. It returns a list of file paths that name the corresponding locations underneath the target directory.

mapFileNames[source_, filenames_, target_] :=
  Module[{depth = FileNameDepth[source]}
  , FileNameJoin[{target, FileNameDrop[#, depth]}]& /@ filenames
  ]

The function uses FileNameDrop to drop the leading source path elements from each filename and FileNameJoin to prepend the target path onto the front of each result. The number of leading elements to drop is determined by applying FileNameDepth to the source path.

For example:

In[83]:= mapFileNames["/a/b", {"/a/b/x.txt", "/a/b/c/y.txt"}, "/d"]
Out[83]= {"/d/x.txt", "/d/c/y.txt"}

Using this function, we can convert a list of HTML file paths under a source directory (source) into corresponding list of text file paths under the target directory (target):

htmlFiles = FileNames["*.html", source, Infinity]

textFiles = StringReplace[
              mapFileNames[source, htmlFiles, target]
              , f__~~".html"~~EndOfString :> f~~".txt"
              ]

These statements retrieve the list of HTML files, map them to the target directory, and then change the file extension from .html to .txt. We can now extract the necessary directory names from the resulting text files:

targetDirs = DeleteDuplicates[FileNameDrop[#, -1]& /@ textFiles]

Again FileNameDrop is used, this time to drop the filename portion from each text file's path.

Next, we need to delete the target directory (if it already exists) and create the new required directories:

If[FileExistsQ[target], DeleteDirectory[target, DeleteContents -> True]]

Scan[CreateDirectory[#, CreateIntermediateDirectories -> True]&, targetDirs]

We can now perform the HTML-to-text transformation, safe in the knowledge that the target directories already exist:

Scan[
  Export[#[[2]], Import[#[[1]], "Plaintext"], "Text"] &
, Transpose[{htmlFiles, textFiles}]
]
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like a really cool solution. Let me play with it! –  programming_historian Nov 15 '11 at 19:29
    
Fantastic - it's working really well. Thanks for the documentation above - this is wonderful for my learning process. –  programming_historian Nov 15 '11 at 20:26

To set the current directory, do something like

SetDirectory["~/Desktop/"]

Now, suppose I wish to obtain a list of all directories in the current directory. I can do

dirs=Pick[
   #,
   (FileType[#] == Directory) & /@ #
   ] &@FileNames[]

which returns a list of the names of all the directories under the current directory that you've set earlier (I use nested pure functions which may be confusing...). You can then do fn to each of the dirs by Scan[fn,dirs]. So, you could assign the Pick[] construct to a function, then use it to recurse down your tree.

This is straightforward but I am not sure it's what you want. Maybe you could be a little more explicit on what you're after so I/we do not sit down and code the wrong thing.

share|improve this answer
    
This is great - and looks smoother than the code I put above. I've put my code up above to try to better explain what I have right now, and what I'm trying to do. Thank you for your patience. –  programming_historian Nov 15 '11 at 17:12
1  
Maybe I'm missing something, but is there a reason why you use this construction instead of something like dirs = Select[FileNames[], (FileType[#] == Directory) &]? –  Heike Nov 15 '11 at 17:39
    
@Heike you're not missing anything! I have no idea why I used this and not some other form. –  acl Nov 15 '11 at 20:14

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