Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I was curious why this works:

function doThis(){
    counter = 0;
    return counter;
};

console.log(counter); // returns "reference error: can't find variable"

which makes sense, as the variable does not exist outside of the function. But if I make a function that self executes:

(function doThis(){
    counter = 0;
    return counter;
})();

console.log(counter); // returns 0

How come the variable counter still exists? It's not a closure, there's nothing that seems to be referencing this variable from the outside, so shouldn't it be destroyed by garbage collection?

share|improve this question
2  
Undeclared variables implicitly become global variables... So in your second example, after the function executes, counter is a global variable... –  Šime Vidas Nov 15 '11 at 15:33
2  
Note that assignments to undeclared variables throw a Reference error in strict mode. Therefore, you should always declare your variables beforehand. –  Šime Vidas Nov 15 '11 at 15:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are creating it as a global as you haven't included var before the variable name.

The function in the first example hasn't been invoked so the variable has not been created yet, in the second one it has so that is why you get 0

What your code should be doing is:

function doThis(){
    var counter = 0;
    return counter;
};
share|improve this answer

First edit them so that it is instantly clear what's happening (no leaving out var hacks):

function doThis(){
    window.counter = 0;
    return counter;
};

console.log(window.counter); // returns undefind

And:

(function doThis(){
    window.counter = 0;
    return counter;
})();

console.log(window.counter); // returns 0

Can you now see what's happening? The function defines a global variable so of course it's not available until the function is called. window refers to the [object global] in browsers.

This is the reason you always want to use either global.something OR var something, so that it's very clear to anyone whether you intend to use global or local variable. If you used var in the OP, the variable would be local.

share|improve this answer

Since you are not declaring it with "var" it gets assigned to the global scope which is visible out side of the function. In the first example you are not executing the function so the counter is never defined where as in the second example you invoke the function and counter gets assigned to the global scope

share|improve this answer

In the first example you haven't called the function and so counter doesn't exist yet (because the code inside the function hasn't executed yet). In the second example, you have defined a function literal and you are self-invoking it. The code inside the function execute and counter is now defined.

Furthermore counter is a global variable because you haven't defined it using var and so it is visible to the scope outside the function. It's the same as doing window.counter = 0.

Now if you had done the following:

(function doThis(){
    var counter = 0; //notice the var
    return counter;
})();

counter would still be undefined because it is local to the scope of the function.

So to recap:

  • In the first example counter is undefined because the code hasn't run yet. If you actually call the function, you will get the same behavior as the second example.
  • In the second example counter is defined and is a global variable (basically the same as window.counter) and it is defined because the code inside the function was executed when you defined it and self-invoked it.
  • In the third example counter is unknown to the global scope because it is local to the function inside which it was defined (because var was used).
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.