Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am getting the "a reference to a volatile field will not be treated as volatile" warning in an application. I understand why.

As a simple example will the below code make the issue thread safe even though I will get the warning still?

private volatile int myVal = 10;
private int myNonVolatileNumber = 50;
private static readonly object lockObject = new object();

private void ChangeValue(ref int Value)
{
  lock (lockObject)
  {
    Value = 0;
  }
}

private void MyMethod()
{
  ChangeValue(ref myVal); //Warning here
  ChangeValue(ref myNonVolatileNumber); //no warning
}
share|improve this question
2  
Note the Interlocked class. –  SLaks Nov 15 '11 at 16:54
    
Increment was the wrong example. Please see updated question –  Jon Nov 15 '11 at 16:56
    
This would serialise all calls to ChangeValue which I doubt is what you want. –  Jodrell Nov 15 '11 at 17:03
2  
Don't use volatile, ever. Read this: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/06/16/…. Quote: "I discourage you from ever making a volatile field". –  Steven Nov 15 '11 at 17:04
1  
@Leppie: To clarify what I mean by serialise in this context. All the functionality of ChangeValue would occur synchronously, one assignation of Value after the other, queued on access to the lockObject. This "serialisation" would occur regardless of the varialbes passed to ChangeValue. Apologies for any overloading of the term "serialise" that may have cause confusion. Have I missed the point again? –  Jodrell Nov 15 '11 at 17:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Locking forces memory barriers on both sides, so yes, your example is thread safe.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I'll stick with a lock! –  Jon Nov 15 '11 at 17:24

You almost answer it yourself:

ChangeValue(ref myVal); //Warning here
ChangeValue(ref myNonVolatileNumber); //no warning

There is only 1 copy of the compiled ChangeValue(), the code inside should implement the 'volatile' behaviour. But the compiler (Jitter) cannot predict all calls when it compiles. The only option would be to treat every ref parameter as volatile, that would be very inefficient.

But see @Steven's comment, volatile is as good as useless and should be avoided.

share|improve this answer

Probably there is no need for the usage of the volatile keyword at the place you have used.

This SO Question answers where all should the volatile keyword should be used if at all:

When should the volatile keyword be used in C#?

share|improve this answer

What would be wrong with

private int val = 10;
private var valLock = new object();
private int nonVolatileNumber = 50;
private var nonVolatileNumberLock = new object();

public int Value
{
    get { lock(valLock) return val; }
    set { lock(valLock) val = value; }
}

public int NonVolatileNumber
{
    get { lock(nonVolatileNumberLock) return nonVolatileNumber; }
    set { lock(nonVolatileNumberLock) nonVolatileNumber = value; }
}

, the only risk here is that subsequent code accesses the property's private member.

In the case of 32bit integers, or even 64bit integers on a 64bit system, becasue the reads wil be atomic, you could use the Interlocked class like this ...

private int val = 10;

public int Value
{
    get { return val; }
    set { Interlocked.Exchange(ref val, value); }
}

Or in the case of a more complex type you could use ReadWriterLockSlim ...

private SomeStructure complex;
private var complexLock = new ReadWriterLockSlim();

public SomeStructure Complex
{
    get
    {
        complexLock.EnterReadLock();
        try
        {
            return complex;
        }
        finally
        {
            complexLock.ExitReadlock();
        }
    }
    set
    {
        complexLock.EnterWriteLock();
        try
        {
            return complex;
        }
        finally
        {
            complexLock.ExitWritelock();
        }
    }
}

This is better than a standard lock because it allows multiple simultaneous reads.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.