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In my ZF 1.11 application I'm storing my translator in registry like this:

Zend_Registry::set('Zend_Translate', $translator);

So in my view scripts I can access the translator this way:

$this->translate('abc');

Is there any clever way to be able to use this call instead:

$this->_('abc');

Using $this->translate clutters the views, and lot's of people are used to seeing _() anyway.

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1  
Cleverness in general is pretty much frowned upon in any kind of software development because someone other than the author will have to read and understand the code at some point. Simple is better than clever but only when it's also clear. –  tjb1982 Nov 15 '11 at 19:22
    
Couldn't agree more. –  mmmshuddup Nov 16 '11 at 9:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Whereas I generally agree with the notion that function/method names should be meaningful, I also agree that the _() for translations is a widely used standard and therefore acceptable.

You can do this by adding wrappers to your intermediate layers. For example the following would make the method available to all your controllers derived from MyProject_Controller_Action:

class MyProject_Controller_Action extends Zend_Controller_Action 
{
    protected $translator;

    public function init()
    {
        $this->translator = Zend_Registry::get('Zend_Translate');
    }



   /**
    * Translator wrapper
    * 
    * @param string $string The string to be translated
    * @return string $translated The translated string
    */
    protected function _($string)
    {
        $translated = $this->translator->translate($string);
        return $translated;
    }
}

Of course the same can be done with Zend_View.

Disclaimer: It is not the best practice to clutter your code with direct calls to the registry. Actually it's an anti-pattern which should be replaced by DI. Zend Framework 2 will make it much easier for us to avoid the registry. This code code be improved by actually injecting the translation object into the class via constructor.

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1  
If he's using translate as much as he said then it would be better to set something like $this->_translator in the constructor so you don't have to grab it from the registry every time the function is called. –  mmmshuddup Nov 16 '11 at 8:50
    
I will improve it as suggested. –  markus Nov 16 '11 at 9:24
    
But I still don't agree with the underscore for protected/private variables. Modern IDEs make this an antiquated practice. –  markus Nov 16 '11 at 9:28
    
lol fair enough. I guess for me it's hard to let go of that particular habit, especially since all of my colleagues adopted it too. I respect your opinion though. Cheers! –  mmmshuddup Nov 16 '11 at 9:30
1  
Keep in mind that this method passes only the first parameter, restricting you to translating items without variables... Normally one would call $this->translate('Open this here door right now, %1$s!', $username); You'd need to add some call_user_func_array magic to make it cover all original usecases. –  kander Dec 6 '12 at 11:00

No, not that I know of. There are several implicit issues related to that anyway. First, you should always give functions (and variables for that matter) meaningful names. That said, __() is not a meaningful name at all. Quite the opposite, in fact, it has no meaning. Second of all, it is considered best practice to prefix only private and protected functions (and, again, variables for that matter) with an underscore.

Finally, with the way zend view helpers work, you would pretty much have to sorta "trick" the system into locating your view helper if it was named __(). You would have to name it something like Zend_View_Helper___ and that wouldn't work. Not to mention, that would entail having to name your file __.php.

I suppose you could name your helper Zend_View_Helper_T, in which case you could translate stuff using $this->t($string); (I tested this and it works), but again you should always use meaningful names.


Edit

Having not realized that you wanted to call this from within the controller until now, I decided to revise my answer and give a little feedback about the comment I received from the down voter..

It's hard to recommend that you create a wrapper class for Zend_Controller_Action in which to create a function _() for the following reason:

  • Because regardless it being an "accepted standard" or not, I reiterate that that all methods and variables should have a meaningful name. I must assert this because I am a firm believer in following explicit coding standards (as opposed to those "hearsay" or "recently-adopted" practices that don't directly correspond to a known - and thereby trusted - paradigm). That said, should PEAR, or even Zend, decide to adopt such a radical change some day, I will resign my disposition. NOTE: It could be argued that credible companies like Drupal and their self-proclaimed best practices could be considered explicit coding standards but I disagree. Why? Because PEAR is...well...it's PEAR. And Zend is "The PHP Company." It's hard to get more credible than that. If anyone disagrees with that last statement please state why or correct me instead of down voting. Regardless, standards are merely a suggestion not required; therefore, they should be treated as such. So, I guess as long as you're following some standard then that's good! These are not rules after all.

Nevertheless, markus' solution was good other than the function name (for reasons stated previously). The only thing I would change is the call to Zend_Registry::get() in the _() function. If you plan to call that function as much as you alluded to, then something like this might work better:

class MyProject_Controller_Action extends Zend_Controller_Action 
{
    /**
     * the translator object
     * @var Zend_Translate
     */
    protected $_translator;

    public function init()
    {
        $this->_translator = Zend_Registry::get('Zend_Translate');
    }

    /**
     * note my new method name, you don't have to use it but I still
     * recommend it. the name is just a suggestion, if you prefer something
     * like _translate() or _trnslte() then by all means (although I don't
     * recommend abbreviations unless they're super obvious I guess).
     */
    protected function _trans($string)
    {
        return $this->_translator->translate((string) $string);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
-1 because some parts of your answer are wrong. a) I agree with the topic of meaningful names but the underscore translator is a widely used standard which is understood. b) on the background of modern IDE's it is not anymore needed or recommended to prefix private and protected methods with and underscore. c) This can be done without any helpers. –  markus Nov 16 '11 at 7:56
1  
I think he is speaking about the Zend Coding standard which doesn't allow unscores as function names and names should be meaningfull. About the the plugin path/classname he is right it will be tricky to make this view helper work. –  Kees Schepers Nov 16 '11 at 8:10
    
1) You're mosty right Kees, that is what I was referring to; except I was referring to PEAR standards not Zend. 2) View Helpers: I guess I figured he would call the translate function from the view, not the controller (which changes a lot imo). –  mmmshuddup Nov 16 '11 at 8:22
    
Great improvement of the post, removed downvote. –  markus Nov 16 '11 at 9:23
1  
@Vexatus As I write in my answer, you can do the same with Zend_View! My_View extends Zend_View ... –  markus Nov 16 '11 at 9:33

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