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I haven't been able to figure out how to deal with a specific regex problem.

Say I have the a big string that consists of lots of phrases in square brackets. A phrase label (eg S or VP), a token (eg w or wSf), a slash next to that token and then the token's description, (eg CC or VBD_MS3).

So here's an example string:

[S w#/CC] [VP mSf/VBD_MS3]

I want to delete the whole first bracketed phrase and put the w inside of it with the second phrase, like this:

[VP wmSf/VBD_MS3]

Is that even possible using regular expressions?


Edit: Okay the pattern is:

[ <label> w#/<label>] [<label> <word>/<label> <word>/<label> <word>/<label>...]

(the second bracketed phrase could have one to any number of / pairs)

where can be any sequence of capital letters that might include an underscore, and word can a sequence of anything that's not whitespace (ie digits/characters/special characters).

share|improve this question
    
you mentioned lots of phrases, can you give generic description of your objective instead of the two phrase example –  Aki Nov 15 '11 at 18:02
    
Is the hash sign really part of the first phrase? You do not mention it in the description. –  choroba Nov 15 '11 at 18:10
    
yes, the hash is part of the phrase. but i don't need it when i attach the w to the word in the second phrase. –  user961627 Nov 15 '11 at 19:30
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Without knowing the actual form or positions, one of these forms might work (untested):

s{\[S (\w+)#/\w+\] (\[VP )(\w+/\w+\])}{$2$1$3}g
or
s{\[(?:S/VP) (\w+)#/\w+\] (\[(?:S/VP) )(\w+/\w+\])}{$2$1$3}g
or
s{\[(?:S/VP)\s+(\w+)#/\w+\]\s+(\[(?:S/VP)\s+)(\w+/\w+\])}{$2$1$3}g

Edit Since your edit has included this pattern
[ <label> w#/<label>] [<label> <word>/<label> <word>/<label> <word>/<label>...]
it makes it easier to come up with a regex that should work.

Good luck!

use strict;
use warnings;


$/ = undef;

my $data = <DATA>;


my $regex = qr{

      \[\s*                         #= Start of token phrase '['
          (?&label) \s+                 # <label> then whitespace's
          ((?&word))                    # Capture $1 - token word, end grp $1
          [#]/(?&label)                   # '#'/<label>
          \s*
      \]                            #= End of token phrase ']'
      \s*
    (                             # Capture grp $2
      \[\s*                         #= Start of normal phrase '['
          (?&label) \s+                 # <label> then whitespace's
    )                             # End grp $2
    (                             # Capture grp $3
          (?&word)/(?&label)            # First <word>/<label> pair
          (?:                     
             \s+(?&word)/(?&label)      # Optional, many <word>/<label> pair's
          )*                      
          \s*
      \]                            #= End of normal phrase ']'
    )                             # End grp $3

   (?(DEFINE)               ## DEFINE's:
     (?<label> \w+)             # <label> - 1 or more word characters
     (?<word>  [^\s\[\]]+ )     # <word>  - 1 or more NOT whitespace, '[' nor ']'
   )
}x;


$data =~ s/$regex/$2$1$3/g;

print $data;

__DATA__

[S w#/CC] [VP mSf/VBD_MS3]

Output:
[VP wmSf/VBD_MS3]

Edit2
"if the label of the character is PP, and if the next phrase's label is NP, then change the next phrase's label to PP as well when joining. eg. input: [PP w#/IN] [NP something/NN] output: [PP wsomething/NN]"

Sure, without adding too many new capture groups, it can be done with a callback.
Actually, there are many ways to do this, including regex conditionals. I think the
simplest method is with a callback, where the logic for all label decisions can be made.

use strict;
use warnings;


$/ = undef;

my $data = <DATA>;


my $regex = qr{

   ( \[\s*                  # 1 - Token phrase label
         (?&label)         
         \s+
   )
         (                  # 2 - Token word
            (?&word)
         )         
         [#]/(?&label)
         \s*
     \]
     \s*

   ( \[\s*                  # 3 - Normal phrase label
         (?&label)
         \s+
   )
      # insert token word ($2) here
   (                        # 4 - The rest ..
         (?&word)/(?&label)
         (?: \s+ (?&word)/(?&label) )*                      
         \s*
      \]
   )

   (?(DEFINE)               ## DEFINE's:
     (?<label> \w+)             # <label> - 1 or more word characters
     (?<word>  [^\s\[\]]+ )     # <word>  - 1 or more NOT whitespace, '[' nor ']'
   )
}x;


$data =~ s/$regex/ checkLabel($1,$3) ."$2$4"/eg;


sub checkLabel
{
   my ($p1, $p2) = @_;
   if ($p1 =~ /\[\s*PP\s/ && $p2 =~ /(\[\s*)NP(\s)/) {
      return $1.'PP'.$2;
      # To use the formatting of the token label, just 'return $p1;'
   }
   return $p2;
}


print $data;

__DATA__

[PP w#/CC] [ NP     mSf/VBD_MS3]
share|improve this answer
    
thanks @sln, this code really helped me learn more about regex! i've modified the help on this page and successfully gotten everything i need, except one issue. is it possible to do the following: - always join the character before # to the next phrase BUT - if the label of the character is PP, and if the next phrase's label is NP, then change the next phrase's label to PP as well when joining. eg. input: [PP w#/IN] [NP something/NN] output: [PP wsomething/NN] <-- so in this case the second phrase's label has changed from NP to PP. –  user961627 Nov 17 '11 at 11:10
    
No problem, added Edit2 . –  sln Nov 17 '11 at 23:41
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Yes,

s|\[S w#/CC\] \[(VP) (mSf/VBD_MS3)\]|[$1 w$2]|;

Now what patterns are you looking for?

You could even do this:

s|\[S (w)#/CC\] \[(VP) (mSf/VBD_MS3)\]|[$2 $1$3]|;
share|improve this answer
    
I think you are not capturing w, shouldn't it be s|\[S (w#)/CC\] \[(VP) (mSf/VBD_MS3)\]|[$2 $1$3]|; –  Aki Nov 15 '11 at 18:09
    
okay i'm confused... should it not be "s/string/replacent/g"? And what do the numbers mean? $1, $2 etc? i've been using basic regex for a while but when it comes to this stuff i don't get it, and i have tried tutorials.. –  user961627 Nov 15 '11 at 18:40
    
Hi Axeman thanks that helped. I edited the question and added the pattern. –  user961627 Nov 15 '11 at 19:22
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Rather than create a magic regex to do the whole job, why not separate the line into phrases, operate on them then return them. This then follows the same logic that you just explained.

This then cleaner, more readable (especially if you add comments) and robust. Of course you will need to tailor to your needs: for example you may want to make the / separated portions into key/value pairs (does the order matter? if not make a hashref); perhaps you don't need to split on / if you never need to modify the label; etc.

Edit per comments: This takes a literal w before a #, stores it, removes the phrase, then tacks the w onto the next phrase. If thats what you need then have at it. Of course I'm sure there are edge cases to look out for, so backup and test first!

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

while( my $line = <DATA> ) {
  #separate phrases, then split phases into whitespace separated pieces
  my @phrases = map { [split /[\s]/] } ($line =~ /\[([^]]+)\]/g);

  my $holder; # holder for 'w' (not really needed if always 'w')
  foreach my $p (@phrases) { # for each phrase
    if ($p->[1] =~ /(w)#/) { # if the second part has 'w#'
      $holder = $1; # keep the 'w' in holder
      $p = undef; #empty to mark for cleaning later
      next; #move to next phrase
    }

    if ($holder) { #if the holder is not empty
      $p->[1] = $holder . $p->[1]; # add the contents of the holder to the second part of this phrase
      $holder = undef; # and then empty the holder
    }
  }

  #remove emptied phrases
  @phrases = grep { $_ } @phrases;

  #reconstitute the line
  print join( ' ', map { '[' . join(' ', @$_) . ']' } @phrases), "\n";
}

__DATA__
[S w#/CC] [VP mSf/VBD_MS3]

Again, it may seem amazing what you can do with one regex, but what happens if your boss comes in and says, "you know, that thing you wrote to do X works great, but now it needs to do Y too". This is why I like to keep nicely separate logic for each logical step.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that worked. However, it assigns the initial "w" to ALL following phrases.. not the one that immediately follows. How do we add that constraint? (Because this code is a little beyond me :( ) –  user961627 Nov 15 '11 at 19:49
    
to get it absolutely right, you want to remove the phrase [] if it has # or if it has S (which one?) and then tack the character before the # onto the next item? –  Joel Berger Nov 15 '11 at 19:53
    
yes, that's right. the phrase i want to remove is one that has a w, but the label could be S or anything else. –  user961627 Nov 15 '11 at 19:55
    
okay a question. in the foreach(@phrases) loop, how can we find the length of a single phrase? what is the type of "p"? i tried scalar, and length, doesn't work. How do we get the number of space-delimited words within a [ phrase ]? Also what is $1? I tried $0 and got the name of the perl file! –  user961627 Nov 17 '11 at 4:15
    
$p is an array reference (use ref $p to see it) (remember that $p is an element of the @phrases array, so $p is really a row in the @array matrix if you like). The elements of @$p are the elements of the phrase, split by whitespace, so the total length is the sum of the lengths of the elements (plus n-1 for the whitespace). $1 is the matched result from the regex matching w. That bit of the code really was leftover from when I wasn't sure if you wanted a literal w or the char before the # or the char after an S, so that probably can be removed if it will always be w –  Joel Berger Nov 17 '11 at 4:41
show 6 more comments
#/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
my $str = "[S w#/CC] [VP mSf/VBD_MS3]";
$str =~ s{\[S w#/CC\]\s*(\[VP\s)(.+)}{$1w$2} and print $str;
share|improve this answer
    
Can you edit your answer to provide some context and explanation? –  Gray Jul 13 '12 at 7:27
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