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My confusion arises from the following statement taken from here:

When pulling patches that conflict each other (e.g., change the same part of the file) Darcs detects the conflict and marks it in the repository content. It then lets the user resolve the problem.

This seemed inconsistent with what I was seeing, so I created the following work-flow using darcs 2.5.2:

  1. Create repo foo;
  2. Create a non-empty file in foo and record it;
  3. Clone foo to bar;
  4. Remove the file in foo and record it;
  5. Add another line to the file in bar and record it;
  6. Pull from foo into bar, obtain conflict notification;

After taking these steps I ran darcs whatsnew in bar, and was shown two 'patch primitives':

  1. A hunk removing all of the "non-empty file in foo", but with no mention of the line added and recorded in bar;
  2. A rmfile removing the file.

My question is: Why is there no mention of the line added and recorded in bar?

If I run darcs revert in bar, then everything makes sense: I see the "non-empty file" affected by neither conflicting patch, as per this statement taken from here:

The command darcs revert will remove the conflict marking and back up to state before conflicting patches.

But then if I run darcs mark-conflicts I am back to the same state as after the pull, with the two 'patch primitives' mentioned above, and no mention of the the line added and recorded in bar.


For reference / reproduction here is my complete work-flow from the command line:

$ mkdir foo
$ cd foo/
foo$ darcs initialize

foo$ touch shopping
foo$ vi shopping          <-- add a couple of lines
foo$ darcs add shopping

foo$ darcs record 
addfile ./shopping
Shall I record this change? (1/2)  [ynW...], or ? for more options: y
hunk ./shopping 1
+cake
+pie
Shall I record this change? (2/2)  [ynW...], or ? for more options: y
What is the patch name? Added shopping
Do you want to add a long comment? [yn]n
Finished recording patch 'Added shopping'

foo$ cd ..
$ darcs get foo/ bar
$ cd bar/

bar$ vi shopping    <-- add another line
bar$ darcs record 
hunk ./shopping 2
+beer
Shall I record this change? (1/1)  [ynW...], or ? for more options: y
What is the patch name? Added beer
Do you want to add a long comment? [yn]n
Finished recording patch 'Added beer'

bar$ cd ../foo
foo$ rm shopping 
foo$ darcs record 
hunk ./shopping 1
-cake
-pie
Shall I record this change? (1/2)  [ynW...], or ? for more options: y
rmfile ./shopping
Shall I record this change? (2/2)  [ynW...], or ? for more options: y
What is the patch name? Removed shopping
Do you want to add a long comment? [yn]n
Finished recording patch 'Removed shopping'

foo$ cd ../bar
bar$ darcs pull
Pulling from "../foo"...
Mon Nov 14 19:26:44 GMT 2011  dukedave@gmail.com
  * Removed shopping
Shall I pull this patch? (1/1)  [ynW...], or ? for more options: y
Backing up ./shopping(-darcs-backup0)
We have conflicts in the following files:
./shopping
Finished pulling and applying.

bar$ darcs whatsnew 
hunk ./shopping 1
-cake
-pie
rmfile ./shopping
share|improve this question
    
Whilst testing this I discovered a bug, caused by trying to mark-conflicts before you revert, after pulling the conflicting patch. I've created a bug for it. –  dukedave Nov 15 '11 at 18:37

1 Answer 1

If you run darcs changes -v inside bar, you'll see the history of your changes, including the conflictor introduced as a result of you pulling conflicting patches.

I've summarised your example to something everso slightly shorter:

DARCS=/usr/bin/darcs

$DARCS init --repo foo
cd foo

echo 'a' > myfile
$DARCS add myfile && $DARCS record -am 'Add myfile'

$DARCS get . ../bar

rm myfile
$DARCS record -am 'Remove myfile'

cd ../bar

echo 'b' >> myfile
$DARCS record -am 'Change myfile'

$DARCS pull -a ../foo

$DARCS changes -v

Now, after that, I see this output from darcs changes -v

Tue Nov 15 19:44:38 GMT 2011  Owen Stephens <darcs@owenstephens.co.uk>
  * Remove myfile
    conflictor [
    hunk ./myfile 2
    +b
    ]
    |:
    hunk ./myfile 1
    -a
    conflictor {{
    |:
    hunk ./myfile 2
    +b
    |:
    hunk ./myfile 1
    -a
    }} []
    |hunk ./myfile 1
    |-a
    |:
    rmfile ./myfile

Tue Nov 15 19:44:38 GMT 2011  Owen Stephens <darcs@owenstephens.co.uk>
  * Change myfile
    hunk ./myfile 2
    +b

Tue Nov 15 19:44:38 GMT 2011  Owen Stephens <darcs@owenstephens.co.uk>
  * Add myfile
    addfile ./myfile
    hunk ./myfile 1
    +a

So, let's explain the crazy output of "Remove myfile". "Remove myfile" exists as the following in foo:

Tue Nov 15 19:44:38 GMT 2011  Owen Stephens <darcs@owenstephens.co.uk>
  * Remove myfile
    hunk ./myfile 1
    -a
    rmfile ./myfile

So, a hunk at line 1 and removal of the file.

Pulling "remove myfile" into bar, we modify the patch contents by introducing special "conflictor" primitives that represent the primitives within "Remove myfile" that conflict with other primitves in bar. N.b. there is no information loss here - we can always get back to the original primitives by unpulling the conflicting changes - in this case, unpulling "change myfile".

Conflictors are confusing, but AFAICT essentially separate changes that conflict with a current patch, x into 2 sets: "ix" which is the set of patches that includes: i) patches that conflict with x and some other patch in the repo ii) patches that conflict with a patch that conflicts with x "xx" which is the sequence of patches that only conflict with the patch x. I think the reason that this is done, is that Conflictors have the effect of "undoing" primitives that cause conflicts, but only those that haven't been undone by another Conflictor.

The output we see is something like:

"conflictor" ix "[" xx "]" x

I'm abusing notation, but hopefully you can somewhat decipher that (see src/Darcs/Patch/V2/(Real.hs|Non.hs) in the darcs.net repo for the full story)

In this case, "Remove myfile" has 2 primitive patches, and (in this case) 2 corresponding conflictors when pulled into bar.

The first primitive (remove line 1 from myfile) only conflicts with the primitive within "Change myfile" (add 'b' to line 2 of myfile) and so that's the first conflictor:

conflictor [    <--- The start of xx (no ix here)
hunk ./myfile 2
+b
]               <--- The end of xx
|:
hunk ./myfile 1 <--- x
-a

N.B ( "|:" is a marker that delimits a "Non" primitve's context from the primitive itself - I won't try and explain it further, just read below |: to see the primitive in question)

The second primitive (remove myfile) is only slightly more complicated: (rmfile myfile) conflicts with (add 'b' to line 2 of myfile) which as we know conflicts with (remove line 1 from myfile), so they both go into "ix", with no patches in "xx". I'll remove the unnecessary "|:" delimiters and space things out:

conflictor {{

hunk ./myfile 2
+b

hunk ./myfile 1
-a

}} 
[]               <--- no xx

|hunk ./myfile 1 <--- start of x
|-a
|:
rmfile ./myfile  <--- end of x

The final (rmfile myfile) has some context to indentify the exact primitive that we're referring to (I'm not really sure why/how this is required, but there we are), which is marked by leading '|'s and delimited by "|:".

Finally, to attempt explain the output of darcs whatsnew in foo; when multiple patches conflict, I think the actual effect of the conflictor is to "undo" any conflicting patches, giving the effect of neither; gives the start of some explanations: http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Understanding_Darcs/Patch_theory_and_conflicts.

I think what you're seeing is the result of the forced commutation of "Change myfile" and "Remove myfile" call them A and B respectively. Then to merge the two, Darcs creates A^-1 and commutes A^-1 and B to give B' and (A^-1)' where B' has the effect of A^-1 (since we're forcing the commutation to work), meaning that the effect of B' (i.e. the merged "remove myfile") is actually to just undo the adding of the line made by "Change myfile".

I haven't had time to look at how darcs mark-conflicts works, so I can't yet explain the working changes you're seeing with darcs changes in bar.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer, unfortunately I am confused by your wording in the paragraph beginning with "Conflictors are confusing" (appropriately). If you have time could you try re-wording it? –  dukedave Nov 17 '11 at 1:01

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