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Sorry for the wall of text, but I wanted to give a good background on the situation. I know you can call methods on null references in IL, but still don't understand a few very strange things that happen when you do it, in regards to my understanding of how the CLR works. The few other questions I've found here regarding this didn't cover the behavior I'm seeing here.

Here is some IL:

.assembly MrSandbox {}
.class private MrSandbox.AClass {
    .field private int32 myField

    .method public int32 GetAnInt() cil managed {
        .maxstack  1
        .locals init ([0] int32 retval)
        ldc.i4.3
        stloc retval
        ldloc retval
        ret
    }

    .method public int32 GetAnotherInt() cil managed {
        .maxstack  1
        .locals init ([0] int32 retval)
        ldarg.0
        ldfld int32 MrSandbox.AClass::myField
        stloc retval
        ldloc retval
        ret
    }
}
.class private MrSandbox.Program {
    .method private static void Main(string[] args) cil managed {
        .entrypoint
        .maxstack  1
        .locals init ([0] class MrSandbox.AClass p,
                      [1] int32 myInt)
        ldnull
        stloc p
        ldloc p
        call instance int32 MrSandbox.AClass::GetAnotherInt()
        stloc myInt
        ldloc myInt
        call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(int32)
        ret
    }
}

Now, when this code runs, we get what I expect to happen, kind of. callvirt will check for null, where call doesn't, however, here on the call a NullReferenceException is thrown. This isn't clear to me, as I would expect a System.AccessViolationException instead. I'll explain my reasoning at the end of this question.

If we replace the code inside Main(string[] args) with this (after the .locals lines):

        ldnull
        stloc p
        ldloc p
        call instance int32 MrSandbox.AClass::GetAnInt()
        stloc myInt
        ldloc myInt
        call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(int32)
        ret

This one, to my surprise, runs, and prints 3 to the console, exiting successfully. I am calling a function on a null reference, and it's executing properly. My guess is that it has something to do with the fact that no instance fields are being called, so the CLR can successfully execute the code.

Finally, and this is where the real confusion sets in for me, replace the code in Main(string[] args) with this (after the .locals lines):

        ldnull
        stloc p
        ldloc p
        call instance int32 MrSandbox.AClass::GetAnInt()
        stloc myInt
        ldloc myInt
        call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(int32)
        call valuetype [mscorlib]System.ConsoleKeyInfo [mscorlib]System.Console::ReadKey()
        pop
        call instance int32 MrSandbox.AClass::GetAnotherInt()
        stloc myInt
        ldloc myInt
        call void [mscorlib]System.Console::WriteLine(int32)
        ret

Now, what would you expect this code to do? I expected the code to write 3 out to the console, read a key from the console, and then fail on a NullReferenceException. Well, none of that happens. Instead, no values are printed to the screen, except for a System.AccessViolationException. Why is it inconsistent?

With the background out of the way, here are my questions:

1) MSDN lists that callvirt will throw a NullReferenceException if obj is null, but call just says that it must not be null. Why then, is it throwing an NRE by default instead of an access violation? It seems to me that call by contract would try and access the memory and fail, instead of doing what callvirt does by checking for null first.

2) Is the reason why the second example works due to the fact that it accesses no class level fields and that call doesn't do a null check? If so, how can a non-static method be invoked on a null reference and return successful? My understanding is that when a reference type is put on the stack, only the Type object it put on the heap. So is the method being called from the type object?

3) Why the difference in exceptions throw between the first and the last example? In my opinion, the 3rd example throws the correct exception, an AccessViolationException since that's exactly what it's trying to do; accessing unallocated memory.


Before the "The behavior is undefined" answers roll in, I know that this is not AT ALL a proper way of writing things, I'm just hoping someone can help to shed some insight on the above questions.

Thanks.

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What does peverify say on your assembly? If it fails, all bets are off. –  leppie Nov 15 '11 at 19:31
    
Interesting: All Classes and Methods in MrSandbox.exe Verified. That is with the last version of the code, that includes both functions (the one with ldfld and the one that returns 3) –  Christopher Currens - MSFT Nov 15 '11 at 19:35
    
That is what I mean :) Posted a semi answer. –  leppie Nov 15 '11 at 19:39
    
PEVerify does fail. I just tried it. You must have done something wrong. –  leppie Nov 15 '11 at 19:43
    
@leppie Yup. You are correct. I had recompiled without the call to GetAnotherInt() and thought it was there. Definitely my error. –  Christopher Currens - MSFT Nov 15 '11 at 19:51
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

1) The processor is raising an access violation. The CLR traps the exception and translates it, based on the exception's access address. Any access within the first 64KB of the address space is re-raised as a managed NullReferencException. Check this answer for reference.

2) Yes, the CLR does not enforce a non-null this value. The C++/CLI compiler for example generates code that doesn't perform this check, much like native C++ does. As long as the method doesn't ever use the this reference this will not cause an exception. The C# compiler explicitly generates code to verify the value of this before the method call, callvirt. See this blog post for reference.

3) You got the IL wrong, GetAnotherInt() is an instance method but you forgot to write the ldloc instruction. You get an AV because the reference pointer is random.

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1) That's great insight into how Windows memory works. 2) As clarification, methods then live on the type object not the instance of the object. The actual method could be found because it's not in the AClass object that would be on the heap, it lives in the type pointer, and since it didn't reference the this value from the function, it ran successfully? 3) When in doubt, always blame your own code first :P. I found it weird it was failing at JITing instead of getting to the ReadKey. –  Christopher Currens - MSFT Nov 15 '11 at 20:02
    
Re 2) no, your methods do not have the static attribute. They are instance methods and have a this reference. GetAnInt() doesn't crash because it doesn't dereference the pointer. –  Hans Passant Nov 15 '11 at 21:31
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I can't answer 2) for sure, but here are for 1) and 3).

A NullReferenceException is the same thing as an AccessViolationException; in the early days of the CLR, there was no AccessViolationException at all and dereferencing an invalid but non-null pointer still gave a NullReferenceException.

This is because on today's computers, it's less expensive to let the hardware do the sanity check. Your conception of which exception to throw is based on the idea that the CLR does explicit null checks (if (foo == null) throw new NullReferenceException()), but this isn't the case on Microsoft's implementation for Windows PCs.

When you dereference an invalid address, your program is interrupted because it did something invalid; the CLR is hooked to that interrupt, and will throw either a NullReferenceException or an AccessViolationException depending on the address that triggered the fault. That way, it doesn't need to insert any memory check and it will still behave in a predictable way.

If I remember correctly, accessing any address under 0xFFFF will result in a NullReferenceException and anything above will be an AccessViolationException. You can verify with unsafe code and pointers. I have myself never used unsafe code in C#, so the following snippet might not work, but I expect the fixes required to test to be trivial. (A friend tested this with the .NET Framework 3 or 3.5 when it was current, so there's a possibility that this data isn't up-to-date.)

byte* foo = null;
*foo; // NullReferenceException
byte* bar = 0x10000;
*foo; // AccessViolationException

My not-too-long-shot about question 2 is that the address of the method to call is determined at compile-time since it cannot vary. The reason a callvirt faults on null references is that it needs to access the vtable of the object, and by doing so it needs to read the object's header. With a regular call, since the method to call does not need to be determined at runtime, there's nothing to lookup and the CLR can proceed directly. (At least, that's roughly how it works for C++, so I suppose it's not too far away from how the CLR works.)

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This is a bit weird as the OP states PEverify does not fail.

That last call to GetAnotherInt looks invalid.

There is nothing on the stack at that moment.

That explains the AccessViolationException at least ;P

Not sure why PEVerify allows it.

Update:

PEVerify does indeed fail.

[IL]: Error: MrSandbox.Program::Main][offset 0x00000021] Stack underflow.
share|improve this answer
    
Yup. You are correct. I had recompiled without the call to GetAnotherInt() and thought it was there. Definitely my error. –  Christopher Currens - MSFT Nov 15 '11 at 19:51
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