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I've got a sequence of bits, say

0110 [1011] 1111

Let's say I want to set that myddle nybble to 0111 as the new value.

Using a positional masking approach with AND or OR, I seem to have no choice but to first unset the original value to 0000, because if I trying ANDing or ORing against that original value of 1011, I'm not going to come out with the desired result of 0111.

Is there another logical operator I should be using to get the desired effect? Or am I locked into 2 operations every time?


The result after kindly assistance was:

inline void foo(Clazz* parent, const Uint8& material, const bool& x, const bool& y, const bool& z)
{
    Uint8 offset = x | (y << 1) | (z << 2); //(0-7)
    Uint64 positionMask = 255 << offset * 8; //255 = length of each entry (8 bits), 8 = number of bits per material entry
    Uint64 value = material << offset * 8;
    parent->childType &= ~positionMask; //flip bits to clear given range.
    parent->childType |= value;
}

...I'm sure this will see further improvement, but this is the (semi-)readable version.

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Is your concern with what you do in the source code, or what object code will be generated? std::vector<bool> or std::bitset (for a couple possibilities) will let you directly manipulate bits at the source code level, but it'll be translated to roughly the operations you've outlined in the object code. –  Jerry Coffin Nov 15 '11 at 19:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you happen to already know the current values of the bits, you can XOR:

  0110 1011 1111
^ 0000 1100 0000

= 0110 0111 1111

(where the 1100 needs to be computed first as the XOR between the current bits and the desired bits).

This is, of course, still 2 operations. The difference is that you could precompute the first XOR in certain circumstances.

Other than this special case, there is no other way. You fundamentally need to represent 3 states: set to 1, set to 0, don't change. You can't do this with a single binary operand.

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1  
@Nick: So if you already know that your start value is ????1011????, and that you need to get to ????1100????, you first compute 000010110000 ^ 000011000000 to get you a "mask". You then apply this mask by XORing. In general, not very useful. In specific cases (where you know before and after values at, say, compile-time), it only takes 1 operation. –  Oli Charlesworth Nov 15 '11 at 19:09
    
Yep, sorry didn't get your edit till after I'd written that comment, then saw your edit and deleted my comment. No worries. I appreciate the suggestion -- in my case, there is no possibility of knowing the XOR mask beforehand. It's a good trick to have up the sleeve, though! Accepting this as the implicit reply is, "It will take 2 ops." –  Nick Wiggill Nov 15 '11 at 19:11

You may want to use bit fields (and perhaps unions if you want to be able to access your structure as a set of bit fields and as an int at the same time) , something along the lines of:

struct foo
{  
unsigned int o1:4;  
unsigned int o2:4;  
unsigned int o3:4;   
};  

foo bar;  

bar.o2 = 0b0111; 

Not sure if it translates into more efficient machine code than your clear/set...

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Well, there's an assembly instruction in MMIX for this:

SETL $1, 0x06BF ; 0110 1011 1111
SETL $2, 0x0070 ; 0000 0111 0000
SETL rM, 0x00F0 ; set mask register

MUX $1,$2,$1 ; result is 0110 0111 1111

But in C++ here's what you're probably thinking of as 'unsetting the previous value'.

int S = 0x6BF;      // starting value:   0110 1011 1111
int M = 0x0F0;      // value mask:       0000 1111 0000
int V = 0x070;      // value:            0000 0111 0000

int N = (S&~M) | V; // new value:        0110 0111 1111

But since the intermediate result 0110 0000 1111 from (S&~M) is never stored in a variable anywhere I wouldn't really call it 'unsetting' anything. It's just a bitwise boolean expression. Any boolean expression with the same truth table will work. Here's another one:

N = ((S^V) & M) ^ A; // corresponds to Oli Charlesworth's answer

The related truth tables:

    S M V  (S& ~M) | V      ((S^V) & M) ^ S
    0 0 0    0 1   0           0   0    0
 *  0 0 1    0 1   1           1   0    0
    0 1 0    0 0   0           0   0    0
    0 1 1    0 0   1           1   1    1
    1 0 0    1 1   1           1   0    1
 *  1 0 1    1 1   1           0   0    1
    1 1 0    0 0   0           1   1    0
    1 1 1    0 0   1           0   0    1
                   ^                    ^
                   |____________________|

The rows marked with '*' don't matter because they won't occur (a bit in V will never be set when the corresponding mask bit is not set). Except for those rows, the truth tables for the expressions are the same.

share|improve this answer
    
I got all excited there, and then discovered what MMIX was. You joker, you. –  Nick Wiggill Nov 15 '11 at 21:43

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