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Is this enough:

    using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(image))
    {
        g.DrawImage(newImage.GetThumbnailImage(10, 10, null, new IntPtr()), 3, 3, 10, 10);
    }

Or should I use:

  using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(image))
        {
            using (Image i = newImage.GetThumbnailImage(10, 10, null, new IntPtr()))
            {
                g.DrawImage(i, 3, 3, 10, 10);
            }
        }

EDIT: Can someone please add some MS reference that even when there is no variable created – the resources will not be freed immediately?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's not going to be disposed unless you specifically call the Dispose() method on it (or it leaves a using block). So in your case, using the second using block would be the safer choice to make sure you free unmanaged resources.

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You should use a using statement for types that implement IDisposable. Otherwise, the resources won't be freed until the object is finalized.

To make the code a tad neater, I like to stack using blocks

  using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(image))
  using (Image i = newImage.GetThumbnailImage(10, 10, null, new IntPtr()))
  {
      g.DrawImage(i, 3, 3, 10, 10);
  }
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Not only will garbage collector not trigger immediatelly, but it might not clear the objects correctly if they hold system resources - like files. I am not sure about Image class though, but still, should your code have to (some day) run on a tight memory, you want image cleaned immediatelly when you are done with it. This is where using and IDisposable come in.

I found a very good blog once about Using block here, following code:

using (MyClass myClass = GetMyClass())
{
    myClass.DoSomething();
}

will behave exactly like this:

MyClass myClass = GetMyClass();
try
{
    myClass.DoSomething();
}
finally
{
    IDisposable disposable = myClass as IDisposable;
    if (disposable != null) disposable.Dispose();
}

So it will clean your Image even if your code throws and exception, and it will cause no problem if you call dispose yourself.

In short: always use using with objects that implement IDisposable, in addition, if the code is complex, call Dispose yourself as soon as you do not need the object anymore - and set the object reference to null.

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