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I have these code lines following:

load()
{
    float* host;
    // init host done

    float** tran;

    printf("testing...\n");

    transpose(host, tran, 600);

    printf("testing. 3..\n");

    printf(" value =%d \n", tran[0][0]); // segmentation here

    printf("done...\n");
}

void transpose(float *input, float** output, int width)
{
    int size = 128*width*sizeof(float);

    // Allocate space on the GPU for input and output
    float* GPU_input = 0;   
    float** GPU_output;

    cudaMalloc(&GPU_input, size);
    cudaMalloc(&GPU_output, size);

    // Copy the input data to the GPU (host to device)
    cudaMemcpy(GPU_input, input, size, cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);

    dim3 threads(32, 32);
    dim3 grid(width/32+1, 128/32);

    printf("OK...\n");

    kernel_transpose<<< grid, threads >>>(GPU_input, GPU_output);

    printf("OK 2...\n");

    // Copy the input data to the GPU (host to device)
    cudaMemcpy(output, GPU_output, size, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);

    printf("OK 3...\n");

    cudaFree(GPU_input);
    cudaFree(GPU_output);

    printf("testing. 2..\n");
}

__global__ void kernel_transpose(float *array, float** output)
{
    int index_x = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x + threadIdx.x;
    int index_y = blockIdx.y*blockDim.y + threadIdx.y;

    output[index_x][index_y] = array[index_x+index_y];
}

compiling and running I got:

testing...
OK...
OK 2...
OK 3...
testing. 2..
testing. 3..
line 84: 26819 Segmentation fault

Why I got "segmentation fault"?and if possible, how to fix it?

share|improve this question
    
What is line 84 and where do testing. 2 and testing. 3 get printed? –  Bart Nov 15 '11 at 19:58
    
@Bart, I updated it for "testing 2 and 3". Segmentation here// at line 84 –  olidev Nov 15 '11 at 20:04
    
where do you allocate input and output? –  neagoegab Nov 15 '11 at 20:08
    
@neagoegab input and output are called from transpose() inside load(). input is allocated correctly –  olidev Nov 15 '11 at 20:16
    
@neagoegab yes, it is ok to do it like that –  olidev Nov 15 '11 at 20:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

host and tran need to be allocated and initialized before you use them. For example, in C you'd use malloc and free, making sure you test the return values in case of allocation errors:

// for strerror
#include <string.h>
...

int iobufsize(width) {
    return 128*width*sizeof(float);
}

float** alloc_matrix(...) {
    float **matrix, *pool;
    int i, eno=0;
    // allocate array of array pointers
    if ((matrix = (float**)malloc( ... ))) {
        /* Allocate array to hold data. This array will be divided up to
           create the arrays used in the matrix. Alternatively, each matrix array
           could be allocated separately.
         */
        if ((pool = (float*) malloc( ... ))) {
            for (i=0; i < ... ; i++) {
                // each item in matrix points to a subarray of the data array
                matrix[i] = pool + i * ...;
            }
        } else {
            /* free() shouldn't change errno, but this isn't guaranteed 
               for every implementation, so save errno to be safe.
             */
            eno = errno;
            free(matrix);
            errno = eno;
            matrix = NULL;
        }
    }
    return matrix;
}
void free_matrix(float **matrix, ...) {
    if (matrix) {
        free(*matrix);
        free(matrix);
    }
}

void load() {
    float* host;
    float** tran;
    int width = 600;
    int size = iobufsize(width);

    if ((host = (float*)malloc(size))) {
        if ((tran = alloc_matrix( ... ))) {
            // initialize 'host' buffer somehow
            ...

            printf("testing\n");

            transpose(host, tran, width);

            printf("testing 3\n");
            printf(" value =%d \n", tran[0][0]);
            printf("done\n");

            free_matrix(tran, ...);
            free(host);
        } else {
            /* Note: strerror isn't thread safe. If load() is run concurrently,
               make use of strerror_r instead.
             */
            fprintf(stderr, "Couldn't allocate output buffer: %s.\n", strerror(errno));
            free(host);
        }
    } else {
        fprintf(stderr, "Couldn't allocate input buffer: %s.\n", strerror(errno));
    }
}

As an improvement, you can bundle the matrix (array of array pointers) into a struct along with the matrix dimensions. This is a step towards creating a matrix class.

In C++, you'd use new[] and delete[], make classes for host and tran, which would be members of another class that manages the interaction . This simplifies memory management (especially whenever new[] throws a bad_alloc) because you can apply the RAII pattern.

There's quite a few other issues with your code. When you allocate (such as with cudaMalloc) or copy (such as with cudaMemcpy) memory, no semantics (such as pointer semantics) are applied to the contents. This has a number of implications in your code. For one thing, each allocation can only give you a 1 dimensional array. If you want higher dimensional arrays, you must allocate arrays of pointers to lower-dimensional arrays, allocate the lower dimensional arrays and then set the pointers in the higher dimensional array to point to the lower dimensional arrays (as outlined in alloc_matrix). cudaMalloc(&GPU_output, size);, for example, creates a 1-dimensional array of float**, but doesn't initialize the contents. As a result, you don't have a valid array of array pointers.

Additionally, the size of GPU_output is wrong; size is the overall data size, not the size for the higher dimensional array. This mistake arises from treating 1 and 2 dimensional arrays the same; they're not. A 1-dimensional array is a contiguous memory region, where the contents are a sequence of objects that all have the same layout (i.e. the array items are homogeneous). A 2-dimensonal array is an array of pointers to arrays. In both cases, the code accesses the arrays via pointers to the first item of the array (e.g. host is a pointer to the first float datum, trans is a pointer to the first pointer to the first array, which is a pointer to the first float datum). alloc_matrix structures the arrays so that you can easily treat the data as having 1 or 2 dimensions because the arrays are themselves contiguous (they're taken from the contiguous memory region pointed to by pool). host[x][y] treats the data as having 2 dimensions. (*host)[x*n+y] (or host[0][x*n+y]), where n is the size of a single data array, treats the data as having 1 dimension.

What you've got:

float **GPU_output --> | float* | -> random memory location
                       | float* | -> random memory location
                          ....       (size / sizeof(float**) pointers total)
                       | float* | -> random memory location

What you want

float **GPU_output --> | float* | --> | float |
                                      | float |
                                         ...     
                                      | float |
                       | float* | --> | float |
                                      | float |
                                         ...     
                                      | float |  
                                  ...            
                       | float* | --> | float |
                                      | float |
                                         ...     
                                      | float |
share|improve this answer
    
yes, host is allocated before with init... tran is copied from cudaMemcpy(output, GPU_output, size, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost); –  olidev Nov 15 '11 at 20:15
    
@devn: the sample code doesn't show either host or tran as being allocated. You need to allocate tran, otherwise you're copying to a random location. The sample code is incomplete and non-representative if the production code allocates host and tran and this isn't shown in the sample. Sample code should precisely reproduce the issue with the production code, not introduce its own errors. –  outis Nov 15 '11 at 20:24
    
@devn but where is copied tran? where in memory? –  neagoegab Nov 15 '11 at 20:25
1  
@devn Yes cudaMemcpy copies data from device to host, but if there is no memory allocated for tran it doesn't magically allocate memory for it. –  Christian Rau Nov 15 '11 at 20:29
1  
@devn: allocate memory for them using a C standard library routine like malloc or the C++ new operator. But the underlying solution is to go and study some learning material on the concept of pointers in C, because clearly you don't understand them, and trying to program a distributed memory architecture like CUDA will be an exercise in futility until you do.... –  talonmies Nov 16 '11 at 1:44

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