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How would I compare two dates to see which is later, using Python?

For example, I want to check if the current date is past the last date in this list I am creating, of holiday dates, so that it will send an email automatically, telling the admin to update the holiday.txt file.

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4  
Er, you use the < and > operators, just like with any other comparison. –  Daniel Roseman Nov 15 '11 at 20:00
1  
How do you compare two <any_type> objects in <any_language>? –  John Machin Nov 15 '11 at 20:25
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@JohnMachin: you write a function with prototype int compare_dates(void const *, void const*), cast both arguments to struct Date * and implement the comparison logic. It may not be that obvious to a Python newcomer. –  larsmans Nov 15 '11 at 20:42
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@larsmans: Sorry .... s/any_language/any_reasonable_language/ and anyone used to an unreasonable language should spend a few minutes perusing the docs and trying out date1 < date2 –  John Machin Nov 15 '11 at 20:51
    
docs.python.org/library/datetime.html#datetime-objects Ctrl-F search for "Supported operations" –  John Machin Nov 15 '11 at 20:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Use the datetime method and the operator < and its kin.

>>> from datetime import datetime
>>> past = datetime.now()
>>> present = datetime.now()
>>> past < present
True
>>> datetime(2012, 1, 1) < present
False
>>> present - datetime(2000, 4, 4)
datetime.timedelta(4242, 75703, 762105)
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datetime.date(2011, 1, 1) < datetime.date(2011, 1, 2) will return True.

datetime.date(2011, 1, 1) - datetime.date(2011, 1, 2) will return datetime.timedelta(-1).

datetime.date(2011, 1, 1) + datetime.date(2011, 1, 2) will return datetime.timedelta(1).

see the docs.

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