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Imagine you have those 3 tables:

enter image description here

And imagine there is massive data according to this schema.

When I run a query like this:

SELECT DISTINCT tPerson.Name, tPerson.Town
FROM tPerson
JOIN tPersonTypeCodeMap ON tPersonTypeCodeMap.PersonId = tPerson.Id
JOIN tPersonHobbyCodeMap ON tPersonHobbyCodeMap.PersonId = tPerson.Id
WHERE tPersonTypeCodeMap.TypeCode IN ('C', 'S', 'P')

It works quite fast!

But when I add the second condition (NOT IN) the query takes ages:

SELECT DISTINCT tPerson.Name, tPerson.Town
FROM tPerson
JOIN tPersonTypeCodeMap ON tPersonTypeCodeMap.PersonId = tPerson.Id
JOIN tPersonHobbyCodeMap ON tPersonHobbyCodeMap.PersonId = tPerson.Id
WHERE tPersonTypeCodeMap.TypeCode IN ('C', 'S', 'P')
 OR tPersonHobbCodeMap.HobbyCode NOT IN ('SKATE','CLIMBING') 

Can you tell me what is the reason that slows down the query and how can I make it work faster?

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1  
Is there an index on typecode and not one on hobbycode? –  Maess Nov 15 '11 at 20:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the first query, most of the filtering can be done by looking only at a single table (tpersonTypeCodeMap). In the second example, two tables need to be JOINed to perform the filtering. Also, once you introduce "OR", you lose the effect of any index.

Is it really true that you want "OR" operating on those two filters, and not "AND"? Also, is it true that you want multiple records per person returned, depending on how many TypeCodes they match and how many HobbyCodes they fail to match?

If the condition "OR" is, in fact, what you want, you can use:

SELECT tPerson.Name, tPerson.Town
FROM tPerson JOIN tPersonTypeCodeMap 
     ON tPersonTypeCodeMap.PersonId = tPerson.Id
WHERE tPersonTypeCodeMap.TypeCode IN ('C', 'S', 'P')
UNION
SELECT tPerson.Name, tPerson.Town JOIN tPersonHobbyCodeMap 
       ON tPersonHobbyCodeMap.PersonId = tPerson.Id
WHERE tPersonHobbCodeMap.HobbyCode NOT IN ('SKATE','CLIMBING')

This will obtain the two sets of records independently then UNION them together. By using UNION instead of UNION ALL, a DISTINCT operation will be returned to reduce the database to unique rows.

share|improve this answer
    
I have edited the question by adding the 'DISTINCT' –  pencilCake Nov 15 '11 at 20:43
    
And yes, I need the OR because I did not want to use EXCEPT. So I have inverted a condition which ended up with OR operator there. –  pencilCake Nov 15 '11 at 20:44
    
I like the UNION idea! So the main reason it makes the whole query work faster is the number of records to be filtered is one SELECT is decreased by splitting it into 2 ? –  pencilCake Nov 15 '11 at 21:25
1  
When you JOIN all three tables and have WHERE conditions on two of them combined with OR, it's likely that tables will get JOINed and then the result will be scanned for matches (but I'm guessing, you should confirm with EXPLAIN). In the later instance, each individual SELECT can be satisfied by filtering only a single table and can therefore take advantage of indexing (at least for the first SELECT). The NOT IN part, however, could return a large number of records unless your database belongs to a skate-climbing organization or some sort. –  Larry Lustig Nov 15 '11 at 21:36

The NOT IN portion is not going to perform well. Try this version.

SELECT tPerson.Name, tPerson.Town
FROM tPerson
JOIN tPersonTypeCodeMap ON tPersonTypeCodeMap.PersonId = tPerson.Id
WHERE tPersonTypeCodeMap.TypeCode IN ('C', 'S', 'P')
 OR NOT EXISTS(SELECT NULL
                   FROM tPersonHobbCodeMap 
                   WHERE tPersonHobbCodeMap.PersonId = tPerson.id
                       AND tPersonHobbCodeMap.HobbyCode IN ('SKATE','CLIMBING') )
share|improve this answer
    
@Joe: WCan you explain the reason why it would not perform well, please? –  pencilCake Nov 15 '11 at 20:45
    
That won't optimize to the same thing? –  Larry Lustig Nov 15 '11 at 20:45
    
@pencilCake and Larry: See NOT IN vs NOT EXISTS –  Joe Stefanelli Nov 15 '11 at 20:48
1  
@Joe: that link talks about the behavior of NOT IN and EXISTS when using a subquery to provide the match values, and the subquery returns one or more NULL values. It does not appear to me to apply to this situation (which involves constant non-NULL values), nor does it talk about performance issues — just what rows will actually get matched. –  Larry Lustig Nov 15 '11 at 21:02

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