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I'm playing around with a simple webserver written in F#. As I have noticed, if I hit refresh in Firefox, after some tries, I get an error page saying:

The connection was reset

The connection to the server was reset while the page was loading.

Why does this occur seemingly randomly (increasing the backlog to 1000 didn't help)? Also, why is Firefox the only browser which displays the response of my webserver? I guess my response is not valid, is that right?

The code of the webserver:

module Program

open System
open System.Net.Sockets
open System.IO

type TcpListener with
   member this.AsyncAcceptSocket =
    Async.FromBeginEnd(this.BeginAcceptSocket, this.EndAcceptSocket)

type Main =
    static member Init () =
        let tcpListener = new TcpListener(80)        
        tcpListener.Start()

        let rec loop =
            async{                                
                let! socket = tcpListener.AsyncAcceptSocket
                Async.Start(loop)
                let stream = new NetworkStream(socket)
                let streamWriter = new StreamWriter(stream)                

                streamWriter.WriteLine("HTTP/1.0 200 OK");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("Date: Fri, 15 Nov 2011 23:59:59 GMT");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("Content-Type: text/html");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("Content-Length: 13540");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("")
                streamWriter.WriteLine("<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC \"-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN\" \"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd\">");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("<html>");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("<body>");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("<h1>This is the title</h1>");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("</body>");
                streamWriter.Write("</html>");                
                streamWriter.Flush()                        
                stream.Close()
                socket.Close()
            }

        Async.Start(loop)

        Console.ReadLine()

Main.Init()

EDIT

It seems the problem isn't related to the way I invoked loop in the previous solution. I have reduced the program to this (and my problems still persist):

module Program

open System
open System.Net.Sockets
open System.IO

let tcpListener = new TcpListener(80)        
tcpListener.Start()

while true do                            
    let socket = tcpListener.AcceptSocket()
    let stream = new NetworkStream(socket)
    let streamWriter = new StreamWriter(stream)                

    streamWriter.WriteLine("response");             
    streamWriter.Flush()                        
    stream.Close()
    socket.Close()

Console.ReadLine()
share|improve this question
4  
That call to Async.Start(loop) sure looks wrong.. –  ildjarn Nov 15 '11 at 20:47
2  
Is it possible that it's because your content length is incorrect? –  Jon Skeet Nov 15 '11 at 20:49
    
The call to Async.Start looks wrong, but I actually think there is nothing technically wrong with it (it just looks a bit confusing). –  Tomas Petricek Nov 15 '11 at 23:09
    
@Tomas : I meant the first one, not the second. Calling Async.Start 2 lines into loop surely can't work as desired -- wouldn't that attempt to spawn an infinite number of sockets? Or maybe I'm missing some detail regarding TcpListener's behavior... –  ildjarn Nov 16 '11 at 0:16
    
@ildjarn I think it is fine, because it will spawn the workflow after a socket was accepted (meaning that a client is connected). The rest of the workflow then processes the current client and the spawned workflow is ready to accept new clients... –  Tomas Petricek Nov 16 '11 at 12:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's a working version. I'd use TcpClient instead of socket so you don't have to manage its underlining stream.

module Program

open System
open System.Net
open System.Net.Sockets
open System.IO

type TcpListener with
   member this.AsyncAcceptTcpClient() =
    Async.FromBeginEnd(this.BeginAcceptTcpClient, this.EndAcceptTcpClient)

type Main =
    static member Init() =
        let tcpListener = new TcpListener(IPAddress.Loopback, 80)
        tcpListener.Start()

        let writeContent() =
            let stream = new MemoryStream()
            let streamWriter = new StreamWriter(stream)
            streamWriter.WriteLine("<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC \"-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN\" \"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd\">")
            streamWriter.WriteLine("<html>")
            streamWriter.WriteLine("<body>")
            streamWriter.WriteLine("<h1>This is the title</h1>")
            streamWriter.WriteLine("</body>")
            streamWriter.Write("</html>")
            streamWriter.Flush()
            stream

        let rec loop() =
            async {
                use! tcp = tcpListener.AsyncAcceptTcpClient()
                let stream = tcp.GetStream()
                use streamWriter = new StreamWriter(stream)
                use content = writeContent()

                streamWriter.WriteLine("HTTP/1.0 200 OK")
                streamWriter.WriteLine("Date: Fri, 15 Nov 2011 23:59:59 GMT")
                streamWriter.WriteLine("Content-Type: text/html")
                streamWriter.WriteLine("Content-Length: {0}", content.Length)
                streamWriter.WriteLine("")
                streamWriter.Flush()

                content.WriteTo stream
                stream.Flush()
                return! loop()
            }

        Async.Start(loop())

        Console.ReadLine() |> ignore

Main.Init()
share|improve this answer

I think you want

type TcpListener with
   member this.AsyncAcceptSocket() =
    Async.FromBeginEnd(this.BeginAcceptSocket, this.EndAcceptSocket)

type Main =
    static member Init () =
        let tcpListener = new TcpListener(80)        
        tcpListener.Start()

        let rec loop() =
            async{                                
                let! socket = tcpListener.AsyncAcceptSocket()
                let stream = new NetworkStream(socket)
                let streamWriter = new StreamWriter(stream)                

                streamWriter.WriteLine("HTTP/1.0 200 OK");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("Date: Fri, 15 Nov 2011 23:59:59 GMT");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("Content-Type: text/html");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("Content-Length: 13540");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("")
                streamWriter.WriteLine("<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC \"-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN\" \"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd\">");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("<html>");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("<body>");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("<h1>This is the title</h1>");
                streamWriter.WriteLine("</body>");
                streamWriter.Write("</html>");                
                streamWriter.Flush()                        
                stream.Close()
                socket.Close()
                return! loop()
            }

        Async.Start(loop())

        Console.ReadLine()

Main.Init()

A couple of changes:

  1. loop is a function, so it needs to accept unit, (), both in the definition and when calling it (same with AsyncAcceptSocket)
  2. your async loop needs to end with return! loop()
  3. you don't need to call Async.Start after AsyncAcceptSocket returns
share|improve this answer
    
While these changes are good it still won't work without setting the correct content length. –  gradbot Nov 15 '11 at 22:04
    
I've never generated an HTML response manually; those were just things that stood out to me. –  Daniel Nov 15 '11 at 22:15
    
I don't think any of these changes are a problem. 1) you can start async workflows multiple times provided that they don't capture any state 3) by calling Async.Start after accepting a socket, you start listening for a new socket immediately, so you get parallel processing 2) since he started waiting for the next socket (by using Async.Start earlier), the loop function doesn't need to loop at the end. Nevertheless, I agree that the style that the OP used is a bit confusing. –  Tomas Petricek Nov 15 '11 at 23:12
    
Right. I couldn't spot a definite problem with his code, but I think this better expresses his intent. Thus my intro: I think this is what you want. –  Daniel Nov 15 '11 at 23:15

This isn't really answer to your question, but just a comment regarding the loop and Async.Start (I think gradbot's version should probably work, answering your main question).

Anyway, contrary to Daniel and gradbot, I think that your use of Async.Start wasn't wrong, but maybe just confusing (and confusingly named).

  • The way you implemented it is that you wait for a socket, then start a new async (ready to accept new socket immediately) and then you process the rest of the work. This means, you can process requests in parallel.

  • The way gradbot and Daniel implemented it is that they accept a socket, send reply to the caller and then wait for another socket. This means that the processing is sequential!

I think the confusion comes from the way you wrote it - I would probably start the processing of the current socket as a new asynchronous workflow and then wait for a next socket (I believe this is easier to understand, but I think your version was correct too):

// Asynchronous function that handles communication with a single client
let handleClient (tcp:TcpClient) = 
  async { 
    try
      let stream = tcp.GetStream() 
      use streamWriter = new StreamWriter(stream) 
      use content = writeContent() 

      streamWriter.WriteLine("HTTP/1.0 200 OK") 
      // Some stuff omitted
      streamWriter.Flush() 

      content.WriteTo stream 
      stream.Flush() 
    finally
      tcp.Dispose() 
  } 

let mainLoop = 
  async {     
    while true do
      // Wait for a client and start async workflow to process it
      let! tcp = tcpListener.AsyncAcceptTcpClient() 
      Async.Start(handleClient tcp) }
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Indeed, my original intention was to process requests in parallel, but your solution is much more clear than mine. –  kahoon Nov 15 '11 at 23:26

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