Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was pondering (and therefore am looking for a way to learn this, and not a better solution) if it is possible to get an array of bits in a structure.

Let me demonstrate by an example. Imagine such a code:

#include <stdio.h>

struct A
{
    unsigned int bit0:1;
    unsigned int bit1:1;
    unsigned int bit2:1;
    unsigned int bit3:1;
};

int main()
{
    struct A a = {1, 0, 1, 1};
    printf("%u\n", a.bit0);
    printf("%u\n", a.bit1);
    printf("%u\n", a.bit2);
    printf("%u\n", a.bit3);
    return 0;
}

In this code, we have 4 individual bits packed in a struct. They can be accessed individually, leaving the job of bit manipulation to the compiler. What I was wondering is if such a thing is possible:

#include <stdio.h>

typedef unsigned int bit:1;

struct B
{
    bit bits[4];
};

int main()
{
    struct B b = {{1, 0, 1, 1}};
    for (i = 0; i < 4; ++i)
        printf("%u\n", b.bits[i]);
    return 0;
}

I tried declaring bits in struct B as unsigned int bits[4]:1 or unsigned int bits:1[4] or similar things to no avail. My best guess was to typedef unsigned int bit:1; and use bit as the type, yet still doesn't work.

My question is, is such a thing possible? If yes, how? If not, why not? The 1 bit unsigned int is a valid type, so why shouldn't you be able to get an array of it?

Again, I don't want a replacement for this, I am just wondering how such a thing is possible.

P.S. I am tagging this as C++, although the code is written in C, because I assume the method would be existent in both languages. If there is a C++ specific way to do it (by using the language constructs, not the libraries) I would also be interested to know.

UPDATE: I am completely aware that I can do the bit operations myself. I have done it a thousand times in the past. I am NOT interested in an answer that says use an array/vector instead and do bit manipulation. I am only thinking if THIS CONSTRUCT is possible or not, NOT an alternative.

Update: Answer for the impatient (thanks to neagoegab):

Instead of

typedef unsigned int bit:1;

I could use

typedef struct
{
    unsigned int value:1;
} bit;

properly using #pragma pack

share|improve this question
1  
Using bitfields will make your program hard to port... are you sure you need them? –  Carl Norum Nov 15 '11 at 21:17
3  
@CarlNorum Didn't I mention 10 times that I am just curious? –  Visa is Racism Nov 15 '11 at 21:17
1  
In that case, as far as I know, there's no way to make an array of bitfields. –  Carl Norum Nov 15 '11 at 21:18
4  
The layout of the bitfields is implementation dependent. So no, rather than being easier it often turns out to be a portability nightmare. The bitwise operators all have well-defined semantics. –  Carl Norum Nov 15 '11 at 21:20
2  
@CarlNorum: It's only a portability nightmare if you try to cast your struct to/from an array of bytes, and expect a particular layout. If all you want to do is store bits in a struct efficiently, then there's no portability issue. –  Craig McQueen Nov 16 '11 at 4:50
show 1 more comment

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A construct like that is not possible(here)

Updated examples(24.12.2013), using < cstdint > header(C++11), fixed union bug in the second one

#include <cstdint>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#pragma pack(push, 1)
struct Bit
{
    uint8_t a_:1;
};
#pragma pack(pop, 1)
typedef Bit bit;

struct B
{
    bit bits[4];
};

int main()
{
    struct B b = {{0, 0, 1, 1}};
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; ++i)
        cout << b.bits[i] <<endl;

    cout<< sizeof(Bit) << endl;
    cout<< sizeof(B) << endl;

    return 0;
}

output:

0 //bit[0] value
0 //bit[1] value
1 //bit[2] value
1 //bit[3] value
1 //sizeof(Bit), one bit is stored in one byte!!!
4 //sizeof(B)

or

#pragma pack(push, 1)
struct Bit
{
union
    {
    uint8_t _value;
    struct {
        uint8_t _bit0:1;
        uint8_t _bit1:1;
        uint8_t _bit2:1;
        uint8_t _bit3:1;
        uint8_t _bit4:1;
        uint8_t _bit5:1;
        uint8_t _bit6:1;
        uint8_t _bit7:1;
        };
    };
};
#pragma pack(pop, 1)
typedef Bit bit;

struct B
{
    union
    {
            uint32_t _value;
            bit bytes[4];//for a 32 bit value
    };
};
share|improve this answer
    
Of course! Put it in a struct how did I miss that! –  Visa is Racism Nov 15 '11 at 23:15
2  
About your second method, doesn't that union get all the _bit* bits on the same overlapping bit? Didn't you mean struct Bit{ union{ char _value; struct { char _bit0:1; char _bit1:1; ....} _bits; }; };? –  Visa is Racism Nov 15 '11 at 23:17
    
Could you please explain those pragma packs? Are they standard C, or Visual C specific? –  Visa is Racism Nov 15 '11 at 23:21
    
pragma pack is implementation-defined because it's not pragma STDC (ISO 9899:1999(S)6.10.6.1). As far as I know, it's defined for MSVC and GCC. –  moshbear Nov 16 '11 at 0:02
1  
Look at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_structure_alignment for a more detailed explanation of exactly what pragma pack does. –  moshbear Nov 16 '11 at 0:04
show 3 more comments

C++ would use std::vector<bool> or std::bitset<N>.

In C, to emulate std::vector<bool> semantics, you use a struct like this:

struct Bits {
    Word word[];
    size_t word_count;
};

where Word is an implementation-defined type equal in width to the data bus of the CPU; wordsize, as used later on, is equal to the width of the data bus.

E.g. Word is uint32_fast_t for 32-bit machines, uint64_fast_t for 64-bit machines; wordsize is 32 for 32-bit machines, and 64 for 64-bit machines.

You use functions/macros to set/clear bits.

To extract a bit, use GET_BIT(bits, bit) (((bits)->)word[(bit)/wordsize] & (1 << ((bit) % wordsize))).

To set a bit, use SET_BIT(bits, bit) (((bits)->)word[(bit)/wordsize] |= (1 << ((bit) % wordsize))).

To clear a bit, use CLEAR_BIT(bits, bit) (((bits)->)word[(bit)/wordsize] &= ~(1 << ((bit) % wordsize))).

To flip a bit, use FLIP_BIT(bits, bit) (((bits)->)word[(bit)/wordsize] ^= (1 << ((bit) % wordsize))).

To add resizeability as per std::vector<bool>, make a resize function which calls realloc on Bits.word and changes Bits.word_count accordingly. The exact details of this is left as a problem.

The same applies for proper range-checking of bit indices.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for going through the trouble of explaining bit operations, but that was obvious to me. My question was about that specific usage (having the bits manipulated by the compiler rather than me). Again, I am not actually using such a thing, but am merely pondering about it. –  Visa is Racism Nov 15 '11 at 21:29
    
Quoting the JSF Coding Style guide: bitset structs shall be avoided unless interfacing with hardware. There's a good reason for that - they are more trouble than they're worth. I'm pretty sure that's also in MISRA, but I don't have a spare $15 to purchase the paper, so I can't give a definitive answer. –  moshbear Nov 15 '11 at 21:31
2  
@Shahbaz: No, the compiler cannot do that. –  Mooing Duck Nov 15 '11 at 22:11
add comment

In C++ you use std::bitset<4>. This will use a minimal number of words for storage and hide all the masking from you. It's really hard to separate the C++ library from the language because so much of the language is implemented in the standard library. In C there's no direct way to create an array of single bits like this, instead you'd create one element of four bits or do the manipulation manually.

EDIT:

The 1 bit unsigned int is a valid type, so why shouldn't you be able to get an array of it?

Actually you can't use a 1 bit unsigned type anywhere other than the context of creating a struct/class member. At that point it's so different from other types it doesn't automatically follow that you could create an array of them.

share|improve this answer
    
Although I explicitly mentioned I am not interested in libraries (since implementing one myself would be simple anyway), but +1 nonetheless because I learned std::bitset exists. –  Visa is Racism Nov 15 '11 at 21:31
add comment

You can also use an array of integers (ints or longs) to build an arbitrarily large bit mask. The select() system call uses this approach for its fd_set type; each bit corresponds to the numbered file descriptor (0..N). Macros are defined: FD_CLR to clear a bit, FD_SET to set a bit, FD_ISSET to test a bit, and FD_SETSIZE is the total number of bits. The macros automatically figure out which integer in the array to access and which bit in the integer. On Unix, see "sys/select.h"; under Windows, I think it is in "winsock.h". You can use the FD technique to make your own definitions for a bit mask. In C++, I suppose you could create a bit-mask object and overload the [] operator to access individual bits.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.