Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

To be precise, you guys may have noticed that facebook has this component placed on the right-most column, this is how it would look when the browser window is maximized: facebook frame (maximized window)

Now, If I resize my browser window to an smaller size, this is how it looks: facebook frame(resized)

As you can see, as the overflowing container re-sizes(because of browser-window re-size), the grip(circled in red) is re-sized too. This to allow scrolling down to the bottom element inside the over-flowing container

I have created a similar component using jQuery-Ui:

My frame with scroll(maximized)

But my problem is that I haven't been able to calculate the NEW grip size for when the container is resized:

My frame with scroll(resized)

Here you can see that I'm almost there, but the grip should indeed be smaller to allow scrolling to the bottom (like the Facebook one).

My Question is, What formula do you suggest using to accomplish this?

Here's what I've been trying so far:

function calculate_grip_size() {
  h = (parseFloat($('#box-container').css('height')) / parseFloat($('#box').css('height'))) * 100;
  $('#grip').css('height', h);
}

and the corresponding HTML for it:

<div id="box-container">
  <div id="area-track">
    <div id="grip">
    </div>
  </div>
  <div id="box">
    <div class="ipsum">
      Lorem ipsum...
    </div>
    <div class="ipsum">
      Lorem ipsum...
    </div>
    <div class="ipsum">
      Lorem ipsum...
    </div>
    <div class="ipsum">
      Lorem ipsum... 
    </div>
    <div class="ipsum">
      Lorem ipsum... 
    </div>
    <div class="ipsum">
      Lorem ipsum 
    </div> 
  </div>
</div>
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was checking out this plugin called slimScroll earlier and the author uses this method - translated to match your selectors (I think); although it would be better to generalize the selectors by using class names instead of IDs:

var minH = 50,
    h = Math.max( $('#box-container').outerHeight() / parseInt($('#box').prop('scrollHeight'),10) * 100, minH );
$('#grip').height(h);

Update: Oops, bad math and forgot to parse the scrollHeight value. Try it now.

Update #2: Ok, I think I found the problem... well two problems.

  1. The above calculation didn't take into account that the grip was inside of the area-track which isn't the same height as the box-container

    $('#grip').height($('#area-track').height() * h);
    
  2. The content was being positioned as a 1:1 ratio with the grip, so it needed to be divided by the content ratio

    increment = parseInt(ui.helper.css('top')) / -h;
    

And here is a demo I made using the code you shared.

Oh, and I had to add padding-bottom: 25px; to the #box css definition so the whole ipsum box was visible - adjust as needed because it depends on how much padding is there.

share|improve this answer
    
:( As it is, that formula creates an enormous grip(like over 15000px tall). I don't understand the formula quite well, so I wouldn't know what could be missing... –  JoseE Nov 15 '11 at 22:09
    
Oops, ok I've updated my answer. –  Mottie Nov 15 '11 at 22:58
    
Sir, It's almost there !; a few notes here; If I don't make the browser window too small it works almost perfect, but it seems the formula starts to fail as the browser window gets smaller, then the grip doesn't shrink enough. Thank you very much nonetheless! If you can investigate further it'd be awesome.. –  JoseE Nov 16 '11 at 0:09
    
The minH value was added to set a minimum height of the grip, set it to 1 and it should work with smaller heights properly. –  Mottie Nov 16 '11 at 16:35
    
Thanks! I'm not sure If that worked, what I can tell you is that it's still imprecise, meaning that it creates a grip that allows scrolling beyond the size of the content. Maybe the problem lies in how I'm scrolling the content. If you have some time check: gist.github.com/1371017 and have a look at the dragGrip function and let me know what you think. Thank you very much, sir ! –  JoseE Nov 16 '11 at 19:17

Don't use .css('height'), use .height(), this returns the calculated height, not the css value.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the tip but I think the result was the same. I believe the formula still needs to be overhauled completely. :( –  JoseE Nov 15 '11 at 21:50

Look at the anatomy of a scrollbar. http://csdgn.org/inform/scrollbar-mechanics

The grip size is usually a multiplication factor * content ratio. If your content is 200px and the outer box is 100px, then your ratio is 2.0. Once the content gets large enough, the grip size would shrink to very small proportions, so you would want a minimum value for it.

The multiplication factor is going to be an arbitrary number of units which you can adjust so that the scrollbar is visually pleasing at all ratios.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I have read the article you posted, and let me tell you, It's probably the best resource out there. You're absolutely right about the simplicity of the formula (mult.factor * ratio), that's pretty much it, BUT, If only I could know how to improve the multiplication factor, That'd be the best. As of now it's arbitrary, and it works..let's say 90% ok. On the other hand, this is one of the cases in which I maybe should just pick a plugin. Do you know a good looking one? Thanks a LOT for you help! :) –  JoseE Nov 16 '11 at 21:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.