Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I seem to be having problems with using a hash parameter to my constructor in Ruby 1.9.2. I note that what I'm trying to do works in 1.8.7. Here is my example code:

def initialize(*params)
    @attr1 = params[:attr1] or nil
    @attr2 = params[:attr2] or nil
end

However, when I try to instantiate an object of this example class, I get an error message on the line where the first instance variable is set: in '[]': can't convert Symbol into Integer (TypeError)

Why does this not work in 1.9.2? And how do I work around it?

share|improve this question
    
The example as given doesn't work in 1.8.7 either. –  Emily Nov 15 '11 at 21:52
    
watch out! you want @attr1 = params[:attr1] || nil, it's not the same. In any case it looks weird, if the key is not found in the hash, you'll already get nil. –  tokland Nov 15 '11 at 22:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't need the splat (*) to capture a single hash argument. It's used to capture an unknown number of arguments. Change your function definition to

def initialize(params = {})
    @attr1 = params[:attr1] or nil
    @attr2 = params[:attr2] or nil
end

and everything should work the way you'd expect. Edit: The params = {} makes the params argument optional, and sets it to an empty hash when nothing is provided.

What's actually being captured in params with the function definion you have now, would be like this:

Whatever.new(:foo => 'foo', :bar => 'bar')
# params contains [{:foo => 'foo', :bar => 'bar'}]

so you'd need to reach into the array first to get the hash, then use the hash keys.

When Ruby sees a set of hash key/value pairs as the last argument to a function, it's automatically wrapped into a Hash. So even though it looks like you're supplying multiple arguments to the function, the interpreter is actually only receiving a single argument.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I added the splat operator so that I could initialize an object with no params hash as well (ie Myclass.new()). Is there any way to do this without using the splat operator? –  Richard Stokes Nov 15 '11 at 22:01
1  
As a simplest way, you can use optional parameters - def initialize(params = {}) –  WarHog Nov 15 '11 at 22:08
    
WarHog is right. I've added that to my answer as well. –  Emily Nov 15 '11 at 22:26

Because from splat * symbol you turn your hash actual parameter into array:

class Test
  def initialize(*params)
    p params
  end
end

Test.new(attr1: 1, attr2: 2)  # => [{:attr1=>1, :attr2=>2}]

Remove * from initialize method:

class Test
  def initialize(params)
    @attr1 = params[:attr1] or nil
    @attr2 = params[:attr2] or nil
  end

  attr_accessor :attr1, :attr2
end

test = Test.new(attr1: 1, attr2: 2)
test.attr1  #= > 1
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.