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I need a certain class to contain a static member that keeps track of everytime an instance of that class is instantiated, essentially so that each instance of the class has a unique index. It works with a non-generic class but this generic implementation fails whenever the type T differs between instances:

class A<T>
{
   private static int counter;

   private static int Counter {
       get { 
          Increment(); 
          return counter; 
       }
   }

   private static void Increment() {
       counter++; 
   }

   public int Index; 

   public A()
   {
       this.Index = Counter; // using A<T>.Counter makes no difference

       Console.WriteLine(this.Index);      
   }
}


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var a = new A<string>();
        var b = new A<string>(); 
        var c = new A<string>();
        var d = new A<int>(); 
    }
}

The output is:

1

2

3

1

As soon as the type T switches to int instead of string, the counter resets.

Does this fail by design, and if so what is the reason or how can I get around it? Or is it a bug? It makes sense to some degree because the type T, being generic, is in the class declaration, but..

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1  
As an aside, you are creating a property whose getter has an observable side effect. Microsoft guidelines recommend using a method rather than a property in that situation. –  Ergwun Nov 16 '11 at 4:52
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6 Answers 6

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Each different T creates a new class for A<T> and hence distinct static counters.

To get around this you can use inheritance like so:

abstract class A
{
   protected static int counter;
}

class A<T> : A
{
   private static int Counter {
       get { 
          Increment(); 
          return counter; 
       }
   }

   private static void Increment() {
       counter++; 
   }

   public int Index; 

   public A()
   {
       this.Index = Counter;

       Console.WriteLine(this.Index);      
   }
}
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Out of the solutions I think this is the most elegant and least intrusive. Thanks! –  Sean Thoman Nov 16 '11 at 2:22
    
...Each different T of value type, for reference types single generic type wrapper will be created and shared across all final implementations –  sll Apr 15 '13 at 14:29
    
@sll - But that doesn't change how this works though. –  Enigmativity Apr 16 '13 at 0:28
    
If you have A<MyClass> and A<MyClass2> - they will share static variables, but A<int> and A<double> does not –  sll Apr 17 '13 at 8:31
    
@sll - I just wrote some test code and they all shared the same static variable - even the value types. –  Enigmativity Apr 17 '13 at 8:44
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Not a bug - this is by design, and is a consequence of how generics work.

A generic type like your A<T> serves as a template - when you use type parameters, the compiler generates an actual class with that type (this class is reused, but a different one will be created for each different type).

This explains the results you see - there is a static field for the A<int> and one for the A<string>.

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Good explanation. –  John Bubriski Nov 18 '11 at 21:57
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This is because different types are generated under the hood for classes with different generic type parameters. This difference is only for the value type parameters as kindly noted by Ben in comment.

Check out these MSDN articles:

EDIT:

Consider following code:

public abstract class GenericBase<T>
{
    public static int Counter { get; set; }        
}

public class GenericInt : GenericBase<int>
{        
}

public class GenericLong : GenericBase<long>
{        
}

public class GenericDecimal : GenericBase<decimal>
{        
}

[TestFixture]
public class GenericsTests
{
    [Test]
    public void StaticContextValueTypeTest()
    {
        GenericDecimal.Counter = 10;
        GenericInt.Counter = 1;
        GenericLong.Counter = 100;

       // !! At this point value of the Counter property
       // in all three types will be different - so does not shared across
       // all types
    }
}
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5  
"different types are generated" is somewhat misleading. Static member variables are instanced for each set of generic type parameters. Methods are only instanced for value types, all reference types share a single implementation. –  Ben Voigt Nov 15 '11 at 22:41
    
Yep exactly, I will add this to answer –  sll Nov 15 '11 at 22:43
    
This is an important difference between how they might work in, say, Java. They are both called generics, and both attempt to solve the same problem, but they're not identical. If you're used to working in one, you will be in for a few surprises when you start working in the other! –  corsiKa Nov 15 '11 at 22:48
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A generic class is a template from which other classes are created. A List<String> and a List<int> are two completely different classes, despite them both originating from List<T>.

Have your generic classes reference a non-generic class that holds the counter. Do not put the static class inside the generic class. This will cause the static class to be generated for each value of T.

class A<T>
{
    private static int Counter {
        get {
            ACounter.Increment();
            return ACounter.counter;
        }
    }

    public int Index;

    public A()
    {
       this.Index = Counter;

       Console.WriteLine(this.Index);
    }
}

static class ACounter
{
    static ACounter() {
        counter = 0;
    }

    public static int counter {get; private set;};

    public static void Increment() {
        counter++;
    }
}
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Generics with different type parameters are different types. So A<int> and A<string> are different classes, and so are allocated different statics.

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This is by design. An instance of A<int> is not an instance of A<string> they are different classes so there are 2 static variable one for each class.

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