Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a problem where I have several tables with date ranges, a start date and an end date. The task I am attempting is to in TSQL (2008 R2) take these tables and combine them into one denormalized table for better lookup in our reporting suite.

The resulting table needs to be the data from each of the combined tables with the date ranges altered so that when the data of one table changes within the period of another the date from the first table is altered and a new record is created to represent the new range.

Basically it needs to be the combination of the splits of the date ranges.

For the purposes of this question I will assume that I have two tables that need to be combined, but in reality I have to do this for several sets of tables each set containing 3-6 tables.

Here's an example of table A and B:

Table A:

IdentityId    EmployeeId  StartDateId  EndDateId    Value
---------------------------------------------------------
1             1           1980-01-01   1980-02-01   A
2             1           1980-02-02   1980-03-01   B
3             1           1980-03-01   -1           C
4             2           1980-01-15   1980-02-01   D
5             2           1980-02-02   1980-02-20   E
6             2           1980-02-21   -1           F

Table B

IdentityId    EmployeeId  StartDateId  EndDateId    Value
---------------------------------------------------------
1             1           1980-01-10   1980-02-01   G
2             1           1980-02-02   1980-03-01   H
3             1           1980-03-02   -1           I
4             2           1980-01-10   1980-02-06   J
5             2           1980-02-07   1980-03-01   K
6             2           1980-03-02   -1           L

The combination would be (The identity column in the result table is just a running counter; it does not correspond to the identity columns in table A or B)

IdentityId    EmployeeId  StartDateId  EndDateId   TableA_Value    TableB_Value
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1             1           1980-01-01   1980-01-10  A               G
2             1           1980-01-10   1980-02-01  A               G
3             1           1980-02-02   1980-03-01  B               H
4             1           1980-03-02   -1          C               I
5             2           1980-01-10   1980-01-15  D               J
6             2           1980-01-15   1980-02-01  D               J
7             2           1980-02-02   1980-02-06  E               J
8             2           1980-02-07   1980-02-20  E               K
9             2           1980-02-21   1980-03-01  F               K
10            2           1980-03-02   -1          F               L

One problem is that I don't want to rely on the fact that each employee has a contiguous set of dates (ie for a single employee id in an ordered set the start date for a subsequent record is the end date for the previous record). In the above example I tried to give all the scenarios that I could imagine in the data set. The only assumption is that the source system has an "ending date range" which is a record that sits is created with the greatest end date for an employee as its StartDateId and has a -1 for the EndDateId.

Another issue that I'm having trouble getting my head around is when I have an end date and a start date doesn't match up. The scenario above with employee 2 for rows 6 and 7 show this.

My first approach was to join each table to a date dimension (the cardinality being a day) like this:

SELECT T1.IdentityId AS FactId, DD.DimDateId
FROM
    [dbo].[Table_A] T1 JOIN [dbo].[DimDate] DD
        ON DD.DimDateId BETWEEN T1.StartDimDateId AND T1.EndDimDateId

Then take each of these result sets and join them together. My thought was that at this point I could see for which days each set of data overlapped. However, I couldn't figure a way of getting back to a range of dates once I broke out to individual days and I'm hitting a performance limiter since I have hundreds of thousands of rows in each table with each row's date range averaging around a month.

Can someone show me / help me understand the solution to this issue? I'm working in SSIS to solve this issue, but at this point I'm trying to execute SQL since I originally thought that there would be a performance benefit.

I think that this particular problem would present itself a lot when dealing with reporting database and analytical solutions (which is what this particular problem is trying to solve)?

EDIT

I did some research on what populates the tables. It looks like the dates for a given employee id are contiguous.

share|improve this question
    
I can't figure out where IdentityID 7 & 8 is coming from in your result + in your sqlstatement, you mention DimDateID between Start- EndDimDateId, but your table B contains a StartDateID and EndDateId. Bottom line, if your inputs and output are correct, I have no idea what logic you used to get there –  Lieven Keersmaekers Nov 16 '11 at 13:01
    
Oops! Thanks for pointing that out. Between writing that question at the end of the day yesterday and editing it this morning I figured I'd make a mistake or two. The identity ids in the tables are just running counters. I am trying to work out the logic on my notepad and just copied it to the screen wrong. –  Mike G Nov 16 '11 at 13:17
    
does your platform has an OVERLAPS operator? –  wildplasser Nov 16 '11 at 13:21
    
I'm not aware of OVERLAPS op in T-SQL in 2008 R2. I have determining overlap: TBL_A.DimEmployeeId = TBL_B.DimEmployeeId AND (TBL_B.DimEndDateId = -1 OR TBL_A.StartDimDateId <= TBL_B.DimEndDateId) AND (TBL_A.EndDimDateId = -1 OR TBL_A.EndDimDateId >= TBL_B.DimStartDateId) –  Mike G Nov 16 '11 at 13:31
    
@Lieven Thanks for pointing that out. I went through my data again and spoke with the designer of the methods that populate each of the tables I'm using and confirmed that if the ending date is MM-dd the next record will be MM-(dd + 1). That will negate the issue you had earlier. –  Mike G Nov 16 '11 at 14:32

1 Answer 1

-- create some tables and data
-- I use the standard convention of using NULL as the end-date
-- for a "still open" interval.
CREATE TABLE tmp.tablea
    ( id serial NOT NULL
    , uid INTEGER NOT NULL
    , begin_date DATE NOT NULL
    , end_date DATE 
    , aval CHAR(1) 
    );
INSERT INTO tmp.tablea (uid, begin_date, end_date, aval) VALUES
  (1, '1980-01-01', '1980-02-01', 'A' )
, (1, '1980-02-01', '1980-03-01', 'B' )
, (1, '1980-03-01', NULL,         'C' )
, (2, '1980-01-15', '1980-02-01', 'D' )
, (2, '1980-02-01', '1980-02-20', 'E' )
, (2, '1980-02-20', NULL,         'F' )
    ;

DROP TABLE tmp.tableb;
CREATE TABLE tmp.tableb
    ( id serial NOT NULL
    , uid INTEGER NOT NULL
    , begin_date DATE NOT NULL
    , end_date DATE 
    , bval CHAR(1) 
    );
INSERT INTO tmp.tableb (uid, begin_date, end_date, bval) VALUES
 (1, '1980-01-10', '1980-02-01', 'G')
,(1, '1980-02-01', '1980-03-01', 'H' )
,(1, '1980-03-01', NULL,         'I' )
,(2, '1980-01-10', '1980-02-06', 'J' )
,(2, '1980-02-06', '1980-03-01', 'K' )
,(2, '1980-03-01', NULL,         'L' )
    ;

SET search_path='tmp';

UPDATE Yet another edit (between is too ugly), fencepost-errors all over the place...

SELECT aa.uid AS uid
    , GREATEST (aa.begin_date, bb.begin_date) as the_begin
    , LEAST (aa.end_date, bb.end_date) as the_end
    , aa.aval
    , aa.begin_date AS bega
    , aa.end_date AS enda
    , bb.bval
    , bb.begin_date AS begb
    , bb.end_date AS endb
FROM tablea aa
    , tableb bb
    WHERE aa.uid = bb.uid
    AND (0=1
        OR (aa.begin_date >= bb.begin_date AND aa.begin_date < bb.end_date  )
        OR (bb.begin_date >= aa.begin_date AND bb.begin_date < aa.end_date )
        OR (bb.end_date > aa.begin_date AND bb.end_date <= aa.end_date  )
        OR (aa.end_date > bb.begin_date AND aa.end_date <= bb.end_date )
        OR (aa.end_date IS NULL AND bb.begin_date >= aa.begin_date)
        OR (bb.end_date IS NULL AND aa.begin_date >= bb.begin_date)
        )
    ;

The result:

 uid | the_begin  |  the_end   | aval |    bega    |    enda    | bval |    begb    |    endb    
-----+------------+------------+------+------------+------------+------+------------+------------
   1 | 1980-01-10 | 1980-02-01 | A    | 1980-01-01 | 1980-02-01 | G    | 1980-01-10 | 1980-02-01
   1 | 1980-02-01 | 1980-03-01 | B    | 1980-02-01 | 1980-03-01 | H    | 1980-02-01 |  1980-03-01
   1 | 1980-03-01 |            | C    | 1980-03-01 |            | I    | 1980-03-01 | 
   2 | 1980-01-15 | 1980-02-01 | D    | 1980-01-15 | 1980-02-01 | J    | 1980-01-10 | 1980-02-06
   2 | 1980-02-01 | 1980-02-06 | E    | 1980-02-01 | 1980-02-20 | J    | 1980-01-10 | 1980-02-06
   2 | 1980-02-06 | 1980-02-20 | E    | 1980-02-01 | 1980-02-20 | K    | 1980-02-06 | 1980-03-01
   2 | 1980-02-20 | 1980-03-01 | F    | 1980-02-20 |            | K    | 1980-02-06 | 1980-03-01
   2 | 1980-03-01 |            | F    | 1980-02-20 |            | L    | 1980-03-01 | 
(8 rows)
share|improve this answer
    
This is about as far as I got working on paper. The result rows are valid, but the set isn't complete. For instance, the first row has begin 1980-01-10 and end 1980-02-01. This encompasses the whole time frame where it needs to be split up as shown in my results set in the question. It would fall into two rows start: 1980-01-01 end:1980-01-10 and start: 1980-01-10 end: 1980-02-01. Your where clause did help me find a few cases was missing so I'm trying to refine this approach. –  Mike G Nov 16 '11 at 15:28
    
But should not there be a record {03-01,03-02,C,I} in your result set? (between IdentityId 3 and 4) Otherwise: please rephrase. –  wildplasser Nov 16 '11 at 16:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.