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I've been training myself up in Android development. I have an idea for a series of apps that all relate to the same basic data store which stores similar/related hobby data. I suppose in my mind access to this data should be similar to how many apps make use contacts. So I started reading up on content providers but from what I can see they don't actually provide the flexibility I require.

What I want is to create say 4 or 5 hobby related apps that record similar and related data however a customer might decide they only need a specific one to start with. Later they might decide that one or more of the other apps might also be useful.

The data the apps store is very similar, the core data is the same. So the obvious choice is a content provider. However I can't see the providers offer the flexibility I require. Firstly how does the 2nd app purchased figure out that a content provider is already available and if so not install its own (this seems to be hardwired in the manifest and there is no programatic control). Secondly how would an app realise there is no content provider and install one (related to point one). Thirdly a new app installed might have a more up to date provider or an older provider!

So I don't think the providers offer what I need. I also notice that the databases are sandboxed and providers seem to be the only method for apps to share persisted data, or is there something I'm missing. It actually makes me wonder how for none default installed content providers how useful providers are!

I suppose an alternative method would be for a customer to purchase and app and then later ad on extra functionality but I'm not sure if this is possible and if so where the information is.

Any help would be appreciated.

Steve

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Note to moderators: at first I thought I'd consider this an argumentative question, but now that I think again I think it's a design problem. A good one that shall stay here.

The data the apps store is very similar, the core data is the same. So the obvious choice is a content provider.

Yes.

Firstly how does the 2nd app purchased figure out that a content provider is already available and if so not install its own (this seems to be hardwired in the manifest and there is no programatic control). Secondly how would an app realise there is no content provider and install one (related to point one). Thirdly a new app installed might have a more up to date provider or an older provider!

Many apps do this by having a "library app" available in the Market that provides the common functionality that other apps from you may need. You should ask the user, in any of those apps, to download that library app to enable the underlying functionality of the "UI apps". I don't know, maybe I would take that route... after all, you need to consider the namespace conflict of your content provider(s), hence the "library app".

I suppose an alternative method would be for a customer to purchase and app and then later ad on extra functionality but I'm not sure if this is possible and if so where the information is.

Yes, that's what the in-app billing is for. However, that assumes you'd have one app with different features.

Truth is, it's a good question. It certainly caught me thinking. I believe it's up to you to provide one app featuring a suite of features added by in-app billing, or many apps that share a common functionality provided by one central app also available in the market.

About this last problem, I would do what feels more natural do the user. If the apps are really unrelated, subject-wise, I'd provide different apps. If it's a suite-like product (think Office suites, for example), I'd implement in-app purchases. There is also a small security issue regarding the code visibility (enabling by software versus per-download).

Anyway, in-app purchases are definitely simpler and easier to maintain, in my opinion. But if your apps are that big, it could be a waste of space... not efficient.

My 2 cents.

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Thanks for the reply David. Somebody else has also mentioned in-app purchases to me so thats two of you now so this is something I'm going to read up on. I could make a base app which functionality could be added to in a modular basis. I could then sell the app with one module, or maybe multiple versions with a different first module. I still think I have found an issue with content providers though, the creation and management of them doesn't seem flexible enough to me at the moment, I think the google are missing a trick here. –  user1048661 Nov 16 '11 at 10:08

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