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In jQuery, I made a complex selector but it's not working. Could someone tell me what I'm doing wrong?

$("#gig:nth-child('3'):contains(:not('a'))")

Thanks!

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It's rather impossible to tell without knowing what the HTML is and which ones you want targeted. –  Joseph Marikle Nov 16 '11 at 0:26
3  
Why isn't it working? What is it supposed to do? Did you forget some spaces? –  SLaks Nov 16 '11 at 0:26
1  
No selector should need to be this complex. Have you considered another solution such as using a class or id to simplify your selector? –  amustill Nov 16 '11 at 0:28
    
I wonder what the jQuery query plan is for this selector –  Esailija Nov 16 '11 at 0:32
    
Please pick an answer and mark it as accepted with the checkmark so the community can know which one solved your problem. –  BoltClock Nov 19 '11 at 4:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're trying to select an element whose text doesn't contain the letter a, you'll want to switch the positions of :contains() and :not() as :contains() isn't supposed to contain another selector. Try this:

$("#gig:nth-child(3):not(:contains('a'))")

If you meant an a element rather than the letter a, use :has():

$("#gig:nth-child(3):not(:has(a))")
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:contains('a') matches elements containing the letter a in its text. If you're looking for elements without a child <a> link

$("#gig:nth-child(3):not(:has(a))")
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First things first:

nth-child accepts an integer not a string.

$("#gig:nth-child(3)

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what is the point of nth-child with id selector –  Esailija Nov 16 '11 at 0:34
    
@Esailijia: It's useful in case the element with the ID is surrounded by siblings that might change in number or position. –  BoltClock Nov 16 '11 at 0:38

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