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I have 2 files, the first file has some HTML and a portion of JS. The second file is the main file, and it loads the first file thru' XmlHttpRequest.

The first file is like this:

<div>
  My HTML contents
</div>

<script id="my_js_block">
function my_function() {
  alert(9);
}
</script>

The second file is like this:

<div id="div_ajax_content">
  &nbsp;
</div>

<script>
function load_ajax_content() { 
  //synchronously with XmlHttpRequest(...,...,false);
  //...load and throw the first file into 'div_ajax_content'
}

load_ajax_content();
my_function();  <-- fails here
</script>

How to solve this matter?

share|improve this question
    
i've just edited the question. –  Jon Dinham Nov 16 '11 at 0:49
    
I guess you can't call the function, because an AJAX - call is asynchronous. That means you have to wait for the call to finish before calling my_function() –  GNi33 Nov 16 '11 at 0:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Adding a script via innerHTML does NOT run the script. Therefore your function is not being defined, hence the failure.

Instead, I suggest loading HTML and JS separately, and either appending the JS using DOM methods to put the <script> tag on the page, or eval() to execute the returned file contents.

share|improve this answer
    
eval() is one of the solution, but i don't know if there is a more pure way –  Jon Dinham Nov 16 '11 at 1:02
1  
eval() is okay to use here because JS is an interpreted language (you don't compile it - browsers do to boost performance, but it is not required), and because it is a one-time thing. If you were to use eval in a big loop, that'd be bad, but for single-use bits like that it's fine. –  Niet the Dark Absol Nov 16 '11 at 1:07
    
will it fail if i call eval("function my_func(){}") twice? (may be error like 'function redefinition'?) –  Jon Dinham Nov 16 '11 at 1:11
1  
I don't think so. Although, I always declare functions with my_func = function() {...}; –  Niet the Dark Absol Nov 16 '11 at 1:14
    
your way to declare the function as variable is great, it makes these functions become global when evaluated by eval(), instead of being 'local' in the context where 'eval()' is called. tks :) –  Jon Dinham Nov 16 '11 at 3:46

Ajax is asynchronous. Your code attempts to call my_function() before the XMLHttpRequest has completed. Do this instead:

<script>
function load_ajax_content() {
    //...load and throw the first file into 'div_ajax_content'
    // then,
    my_function();
}

load_ajax_content();
</script>

Okay, so now your ajax call is synchronous. You can parse the returned HTML for <script> tags, and handle them separately, but it's not pretty:

function load_ajax_content() {
    //...load and throw the first file into 'div_ajax_content'
    // then grab the script nodes one-by-one
    var scriptElts = document.getElementById('div_ajax_content').getElementsByTagName('script'),
        scriptElt,
        propName; // http://www.quirksmode.org/dom/w3c_html.html#t07

    if (scriptElts.length) {
        propName = scriptElts[0].textContent ? 'textContent' : 'innerText';
    }

    for (var i=0; i<scriptElts.length; i++) {
        scriptElt = document.createElement('script');
        scriptElt[propName] = scriptElts[i][propName];
        document.body.appendChild(scriptElt);
    }

    // finally,
    my_function();
}

...or you could just use a library like jQuery, which automagically handles this exact problem (and many others!) for you.

share|improve this answer
    
i've just amended the question. it loads synchronously –  Jon Dinham Nov 16 '11 at 0:52
1  
@PaulDinh Still, in your given example, you are calling my_function()right after load_ajax_content(), while the request is still "on the way". Try moving the my_function() call to the end of your load_ajax_content - function as Matt suggested and it should work. –  GNi33 Nov 16 '11 at 0:55
2  
@Paul see my edit. –  Matt Ball Nov 16 '11 at 1:11
1  
@PaulDinh Ah, I see, sorry. Learned something again today trough that example :) –  GNi33 Nov 16 '11 at 1:13
1  
@PaulDinh But please, don't use it unless you can make absolutely sure that it's impossible for a user to input something that gets passed to eval() –  GNi33 Nov 17 '11 at 1:43

Following Kolink I found a pretty funny method but it works!

load_ajax_contents();
eval(document.getElementById("my_js_block").innerHTML);
my_function();

However, in order to make those functions evaluated by 'eval()' global, all the functions in the first file must be declared as variables, like this:

//this works!
my_function = function() {
  alert(9);
}

and not:

//this makes the function nested in the context where eval() is called
function my_function() { 
  alert(9);
}

and also not:

//this makes the variable local to the context where eval() is called
var my_function = function() {
  alert(9);
}
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