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In my little code snippet below I have a wrapper class for a simple dynamic object that, when not null, I can access two properties of, "id" and "name". It's a Facebook object, for those playing at home.

Anyway, in my GET accessor you can see I have to check if the dynamic object I was given was null, since referencing a dynamic property on a null reference will AV. But since I'm probably about the millionth person to do this, I assume there's a more concise and elegant way to express this.

Please enlighten me, oh mighty sages. Thanks!

public class IdNamePair
{
    private dynamic _data;
    public IdNamePair(dynamic data)
    {
        _data = data;
    }
    public string Id
    {
        get
        {
            return (_data == null) ? null : _data.id;
        }
    }
    public string Name
    {
        get
        {
            return (_data == null) ? null :_data.name;
        }
    }
}
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I've done what you do -- you can't use the ?? shortcut here. Curious if anyone responds with something better. –  Joe Nov 16 '11 at 1:05
    
There are tons of dupes of this question on SO. This is a very common ask... –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 16 '11 at 1:10
    
This is OT, but if you can't do anything will null _data, why build a pair in the first place? –  Ritch Melton Nov 16 '11 at 1:33
    
"A better way to do this" is a popular item on lists of features people would like to see added in C#. A suggestion I've seen a few times is to use ??? to extend ?? to cover nulls in any step of an expression, so e.g. foo.bar.baz ??? null would return foo.bar.baz, but if foo or bar or baz were null, it would return null. –  Carson63000 Nov 16 '11 at 2:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There is nothing wrong with what you have done, the only thing I would do is drop the brackets and change the evaluation:

return _data != null ? _data.name : null;

Doing it that way is just (IMVHO) slightly easier to read, but fundamentally identical to what you had.

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Maybe it's not the same in c# but isn't the != unnecessary? return_data?_data.id:null; –  Robot Woods Nov 16 '11 at 1:11
3  
@RobotWoods: In C# it is necessary to use !=. C# won't accept it as a boolean expression otherwise, and will raise a compile error. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Nov 16 '11 at 1:16
1  
in c# null doesn't implicitly cast to false so the != null is required –  Martin Booth Nov 16 '11 at 1:16
3  
@Robot: Nope, in C# there's no automatic conversion from reference type to bool. You're probably thinking of the C/C++ pointer-to-bool, which is more like pointer-to-integer that is true if nonzero and false if zero. –  Johann Gerell Nov 16 '11 at 1:17
    
Thanks all, I wasn't sure what elements are common between C variants –  Robot Woods Nov 16 '11 at 1:35

Nope, that's pretty much the way you have to do it. Guess you're smarter than you thought :)

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Using the code you already have is most likely the best solution. But if you wanted, you could create an extension method like this:

public static TResult Select<T, TResult>(this T obj, Func<T, TResult> func)
    where T : class
    where TResult : class
{
    return obj == null ? null : func(obj);
}

and use it like this:

public string Id
{
    get
    {
        return _data.Select(d => d.id);
    }
}

But this would make the code less readable for most people. And that method maybe should have a better name.

Doing this basically treats the nullable reference types as Maybe monad.

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