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I was playing with Visual Studio and templates.

Consider this code

struct Foo
{
  struct Bar
  {
  };

  static const int Bar=42;
};

template<typename T>
void MyFunction()
{
  typename T::Bar f;  
}

int main()
{
    MyFunction<Foo>();
    return 0;
}

When I compile this is either Visual Studio 2008 and 11, I get the following error

error C2146: syntax error : missing ';' before identifier 'f'

Is Visual Studio correct in this regard ? Is the code violating any standards ?

If I change the code to

struct Foo
{
  struct Bar
  {
  };

  static const int Bar=42;
};


void SecondFunction( const int& )
{
}

template<typename T>
void MyFunction()
{
  SecondFunction( T::Bar ); 
}

int main()
{
    MyFunction<Foo>();
    return 0;
}

it compiles without any warnings. In Foo::BLAH a member preferred over a type in case of conflicts ?

EDIT Tests on G++ 4.2.1

struct Foo
{
  static const int Bar=42;
};


void SecondFunction(const int& x)
{
}

template<typename T>
void MyFunction()
{
  int x = Foo::Bar;
}

int main()
{
  MyFunction<Foo>();
  return 0;
}

compiles OK.

struct Foo
{
  static const int Bar=42;
};


void SecondFunction(const int& x)
{
}

template<typename T>
void MyFunction()
{
  SecondFunction(T::Bar);
}

int main()
{
  MyFunction<Foo>();
  return 0;
}

Gives me these errors

Undefined symbols: "Foo::Bar", referenced from: void MyFunction() in cck498aS.o ld: symbol(s) not found collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

share|improve this question
    
Compiles fine in GCC 4.6.2. I'd blame MS. They're pretty famous for not implementing template lookup in a standard-conforming way. Also, the type is also a member -- it's a member type. –  Kerrek SB Nov 16 '11 at 1:47
    
Your final error is a linker error, not a compiler error, since you never defined Foo::Bar. Say const int Foo::Bar; to do so. –  Kerrek SB Nov 16 '11 at 2:28
    
Wow.. i learned a lot today.. i think static const int was defined and declared in place –  parapura rajkumar Nov 16 '11 at 2:36
1  
Nope. It's only declared and initialized in place, but not defined. Often you can get away with it, though, e.g. as long as you don't take its address or anything like that. Static constants can essentially be replaced by their value at compile-time, so they don't always need to "exist" physically. –  Kerrek SB Nov 16 '11 at 2:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In C++, named entities fall into one of three distinct ontological tiers: values, types and templates.

If a dependent name is of an unknown tier, then you must tell the compiler what it is:

  • If you say nothing, it's a value.

  • If you say typename, it's a type.

  • If you say template, it's a template.

So T::Bar, being a dependent name inside the MyFunction template, is automatically assumed to refer to a value, hence the int member Foo::Bar. On the other hand, in the first example, typename T::Bar indeed refers to the member type Foo::Bar.

share|improve this answer

You see the effect of a not well known rule which exists for C compatibility. In C, unlike in C++, if you define a type as struct X or enum X, you do not introduce the name X into the corresponding namespace, but have to refer to the type as struct X. For that reason, in C you can additionally define 'X' as something different without triggering conflicting definitions. Now in C++, struct X does introduce the name X into the corresponding scope. Therefore any other definition of X would be flagged as double-definition. However it was deemed important to be able to include C headers where this problem frequently occurs. Therefore a special rule was introduced that whenever you both have a (non-typedef) type definition for X and another definition for X, this does not lead to an error, but X refers to the non-type definition, and to get at the type definition, you have to prefix it with the corresponding type keyword (i.e. struct X, emum X or class X).

In your case, this means that Foo contains a type named class Bar and a static const int named Bar, but no type named Bar. Note that the template isn't needed here; a simple global declaration Bar::Foo foo; should also fail.

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