Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my controller I have

 public JsonResult GetInfo(string id)

in my js

 $.ajax({
        contentType: 'application/json, charset=utf-8',
        type: "POST",
        url: "/Incidents/GetInfo",
        data: { id: "777" },
        cache: false,
        dataType: "json",

        success: function (response) {
//etc....

jquery ajax error delegate gets executed. If I use

 data: { "777" },

no error, but the value doesn't get passed. This should be easy but I am beating my head against the wall. Maybe I am not allowed to pass strings to controller's actions?

What am I doing wrong here?

share|improve this question
    
Which version of MVC are you using? If you are using MVC 2, you must install the JsonValueProviderFactory from MVC Futures. –  counsellorben Nov 16 '11 at 3:10
    
I am using mvc 3 –  sarsnake Nov 16 '11 at 4:49
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You are indicating application/json request and you are sending a application/x-www-form-urlencoded request. So you will have to choose between one of the two ways to encode parameters and not mix them.

application/x-www-form-urlencoded:

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "/Incidents/GetInfo",
    data: { id: "777" },
    cache: false,
    dataType: "json",
    ...
});

application/json:

$.ajax({
    type: "POST",
    url: "/Incidents/GetInfo",
    contentType: 'application/json, charset=utf-8',
    data: JSON.stringify({ id: "777" }),
    cache: false,
    dataType: "json",
    ...
});

The JSON.stringify method is natively built into modern browsers and is used to convert the javascript literal into a JSON string which is what we indicated that we are going to send the request as. If you are having to support legacy browsers you could include the json2.js script to your page which contains this method.

As a side note the dataType: "json" setting is not needed since the server will set the proper Content-Type header to application/json and jQuery is smart enough to use that.

And as a second side note you really don't want to be hardcoding an url like this in your javascript file: url: "/Incidents/GetInfo". What you want is to use url helpers when generating urls: url: "@Url.Action("GetInfo", "Incidents")".

share|improve this answer
    
i will try json.stringify again - I think I did already, but never hurts. Initially I had something like var data = JSON.stringify(id) and then data:data. But it looks like I missed the id: part. I will try tomorrow and let you know. –  sarsnake Nov 16 '11 at 8:12
    
@sarsnake, JSON.stringify(id) is wrong. The stringify method expects a javascript object: JSON.stringify({ id: id }) where you have defined the id variable previously. See my answer. –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 16 '11 at 8:16
    
quick question, Darin - i used to use JSON.stringify all the time, but my impression was that doing something like {"id":"777"} is basically doing the same thing? Is it not? Looks like JSON format to me. –  sarsnake Nov 16 '11 at 8:17
1  
@sarsnake, it's absolutely not the same thing. It might look like JSON format to you but it is not. It is called javascript literal. jQuery transforms javascript literals using application/x-www-form-urlencoded. Use debugging tools such as FireBug and look at the request being send. When you use data: { foo: 'f', bar: 'b' } the actual request will look like this: foo=f&bar=b. JSON.stringify on the other hand converts the javascript literal into a JSON string. So data: JSON.stringify({ foo: 'f', bar: 'b' }) will be sent like this: { "foo": "f", "bar": "b" }. See? Nothing in common. –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 16 '11 at 8:21
    
thanks Darin. That's quite misleading:) –  sarsnake Nov 16 '11 at 18:20
show 1 more comment

Are you missing HttpPost attribute in your action? If not, use something like firebug or chrome dev tools to see http request/response and get more details...

[HttpPost]
public JsonResult GetInfo(string id)
share|improve this answer
    
thanks I will try it. Hopefully this would shed the light on this mystery –  sarsnake Nov 16 '11 at 4:57
    
It is not necessary to have this attribute and adding it will not solve the issue. This attribute enforces POST but actions that do not have it can be called with any verb. –  Darin Dimitrov Nov 16 '11 at 7:08
    
@DarinDimitrov interesting...wasn't aware of that. thx for comment. –  B Z Nov 16 '11 at 15:44
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.