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My current project has me accessing a database quite frequently. To do so, I make calls to my Java Servlet through jQuery Get and Post calls. I was wondering if it was better practice to build any HTML using the data I gather from the database within the servlet before I ship it back to the jQuery or if I should do the HTML injecting with JavaScript alone? For example, let's say I have a database table with a user ID and a username. If I wanted to create a select box off this table, which would be the better way? Or is there even a better way? Would it be better to just try send the rawest form of the data retrieved from the database from the servlet to the JavaScript, allowing it to handle all of the HTML formatting?

Method 1 (Java)

Given the Following HTML/JavaScript

<html>
    <head>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="scripts/jquery.min.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            $(document).ready(function() {
                $.get("servlet?cmd=getUsers", function(data) {
                    $("#select").html(data);
                }, "html");
            });
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="select"></div>
    </body>
</html>

Using The Following Servlet

PrintWriter writer = response.getWriter();
response.setContentType("text/html");

writer.println("<select id='userSelect' name='user'>");
while(resultSet.next()) {
    String userId = resultSet.getString("ixUser");
    String userName = resultSet.getString("sName");

    writer.println("<option value='" + userId + "'>" + userName + "</option>");
}
writer.println("</select>");

Method 2 (JavaScript)

Given the Following HTML/JavaScript

<html>
    <head>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="scripts/jquery.min.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            $(document).ready(function() {
                $.get("servlet?cmd=getUsers", function(data) {
                    $("#select").html("<select id='userSelect' name='user'>");
                    $(data).find("user").each(function() {
                        var id = $(this).find("id").text();
                        var name = $(this).find("name").text();

                        $("#userSelect").append("<option value='" + id + "'>" + name + "</option>");
                    });
                    $("#select").append("</select>");
                }, "xml");
            });
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="select"></div>
    </body>
</html>

Using the Following Servlet

PrintWriter writer = response.getWriter();
response.setContentType("text/xml");

writer.println("<xml>");
while(resultSet.next()) {
    String userId = resultSet.getString("ixUser");
    String userName = resultSet.getString("sName");

    writer.println("<user>");
    writer.println("<id>" + userid + "</id>");
    writer.println("<name>" + userName + "</name>");
    writer.println("</user>");
}
writer.println("</xml>");
share|improve this question
1  
It is best to use a JSP. –  Matt Ball Nov 16 '11 at 2:10
1  
Don't return HTML over ajax. Return JSON data. Then build document fragments from JSON and inject them into the DOM –  Raynos Nov 16 '11 at 2:11
    
Alright, it sounds as though JSON is the way to go. Though all of the answers given were incredibly helpful, I'll just have to accept the first one I found which answered my questions. –  Kris Schouw Nov 16 '11 at 2:50
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd opt for sending raw (well, JSON) data to the client and have Javascript take care of the templating. Why?

Separation of concerns: Your server code shouldn't be aware of the presentation logic.

Less bandwidth: If you can save a few k/request (at least), why not?

share|improve this answer
    
The separation of concerns was the issue I was thinking of mostly. Since I'm new to web development, my boss was the one that recommended the first method. Since I've done a lot of OOP in C++, I felt as though method 2 (or even the JSON version) is much better for that reason. –  Kris Schouw Nov 16 '11 at 2:42
    
I agree, if you are doing client side page updates you should be sending data only(JSON ideally). This approach also lets you take advantage of all that wasted client cpu instead of forcing your servers to do all the work. –  Justin Nov 16 '11 at 3:11
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It seems that the world is moving towards your second approach. There are several reasons for this:

  1. Your users will perceive that your application is more responsive than it actually is because the page will be loaded in parts, so there is always progress being made (or at least a progress indicator if there is something that takes a long time to load).
  2. You can re-use the data services for additional clients other than your website (think native mobile apps).
  3. The data format is almost always more compressed than the html that is generated, so you send less data over the wire. I would actually recommend json over xml for this reason.
  4. The javascript engines in most browsers are much more efficient than they were a few years ago. This allows you to offload some of the more complex page layout logic from your server, making your application more scalable.
  5. It will be easier to test that the data returned is correct without having to wade through the formatting html to access it.
share|improve this answer
    
1. and 2. don't really seem to apply. 2. is valid but (think mobile) is not. 2. may be valid if you want say a Java application to talk to the servlet and parse the JSON –  Raynos Nov 16 '11 at 2:15
1  
I'm not sure why you think that. These are not very controversial points. For the first point, the page layout will be rendered immediately while the data for the content is loaded. For the second, any client application written in any programming language I can think of can parse JSON. –  Ryan Gross Nov 16 '11 at 2:22
    
I interpreted "think mobile" as "think mobile websites" >_<. The first doesn't make sense. Whether you send HTML and then inject it or send JSON and then build HTML and inject it, I don't see how the second could be any more immediate or responsive. –  Raynos Nov 16 '11 at 2:31
    
Alright, all these points seem valid, especially that last one. I was checking the validity of the data returned with a silly alert(data); statement in the success function... It wasn't pretty... So building and shipping a JSON back to the JavaScript from the servlet is the best way to go, then? –  Kris Schouw Nov 16 '11 at 2:38
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I'd suggest returning only the data in a lightweight manner such as JSON.

My reasons:

  • Bandwidth
  • Smaller data to be cached when performance concerns come into play
  • Flexibility. If you wanted to expose this data to another part of your application or a mobile device?

There are several other methods but in my mind this is a much more organized approach. Let the client deal with the markup processing.

I would suggest jQote2 as an awesome client side templating tool. (It's just awesome!)

share|improve this answer
    
I'll look into jQote2 (jQuote2?) then, thank you. –  Kris Schouw Nov 16 '11 at 2:41
    
no, "jQote2" here –  roselan Nov 16 '11 at 3:08
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These days the cool kids do MVC on the browser. -- Your method 2, but a more sophisticated client-side stack.

In other words, your server exports an api that provides data, not html.

Then, on the browser, your JS app has separate Model, View and Controller code. See the Backbone project for the Model and Controller layer, Mustache for the View/Template layer. An article. Another post.

share|improve this answer
    
Alright, thank you. I'll look into those, though I'm probably too far in this project to go back and make such drastic modifications. –  Kris Schouw Nov 16 '11 at 2:37
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method 1, as you are not comfortable enough with method 2.

a few words on method 2. choose between string concatenation, or object building.

var html = '<select...
...
html .= '</select>';
$("#select").append(html);

or

var $sel = $('<select>').attr('id', 'userSelect').attr('name', 'user').

as you see, $('<tag>') syntax creates a new dom element.

Moreover, return a json object instead of xml if you can. They are more easy to work with in javascript. So you can do

for (i in data) {
   $('<option>').text(data[i].name).val(data[i].id).appendTo($sel);
}
$("#select").append($sel);

And then, there is method3: templating...

share|improve this answer
    
Is templating (method 3) still done on the client side? So the servlet can still just send a JSON back to the JavaScript, and then from there I use some form of templating? Or is there another step for this method I'm missing? –  Kris Schouw Nov 16 '11 at 2:40
    
as said here, template plugins (pure, mustache, deprecated-before-born $.tmpl()) are the flavor of the time. You can still output an "empty" html structure with display hidden, and use it as template with $.clone() (and even ajax load the template), but more "work" is usually needed. Anyway, no js template plugin has "won" like jquery more or less won in the "libraries". Check Pure and mustache, as they are a bit on opposite edges, implementation wise. renderjs looks promising, but not yet beta. I use my own system, it's fun and flexible, but that means I have little xp with template plugins. –  roselan Nov 16 '11 at 3:05
    
Finally, all the templates plugins are evolving quite fast. It's nice, but it means a bit of maintenance too. Yet, once you grabbed the concept, usage is often very near: $('#destination').templatePlugin(template, jsonData);. Difference rise for templates "functionality" (placeHolders, logic (if, loops)). –  roselan Nov 16 '11 at 3:15
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