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I am having problem with css media query in Firefox. It works correct in Chrome like I made two DIVs and want a scrollbar. If I decrease the screen size of firefox upto 800px then both DIVs collapse and after some pixels media query works but that not happens in Chrome.

check this fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/RMvqC/2/

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1  
+1 i also facing the same issue –  sandeep Nov 16 '11 at 4:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Firefox & Webkit based browsers render the scrollbar differently. In Firefox, MediaQuery considered width of scrollbar which is 15px with the screen width, but in Webkit based browsers it's not considered scrollbar with the screen width. So, that's why the floated DIVs are collapsed in Firefox.

I did some stuff with css may be that's help you. (check this fiddle)

        html {
            /* force scrollbars */
            height: 101%;
        }
        body {
            margin: 0; 
            padding:0; 
            white-space:nowrap; 
        }  
        #box1,
        #box2 {
            display:inline-block;
            width: 400px;
            height: 200px;  
            vertical-align:top;
            white-space:normal;
        }
        #box1 {
            background: #ce0000;
             margin-right:-5px;
        }
        #box2 {
            background: #8e0000;
        }

        @media screen and (max-width: 799px) { 
            body { 
                white-space:normal; 
            }
            #box1,
            #box2 {
                width: 300px;
            }
        }
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1  
Such a pain, this is why I hate front end sometimes/most of the time –  Adam Waite Oct 6 '12 at 17:14
1  
This has since changed around Chrome 29 I think. The scrollbar is now included in the width of the page with respect to media query calculation –  Simon_Weaver May 11 at 23:34

Firefox & Opera follows W3C spec which is to include scrollbar width in media queries width (the reason might be to avoid infinite loop as described in a comment here), while Webkit does not (possibly coz they think it makes no sense)

There is a workaround (I've only tested this on FF), apparently if you force scrollbar to be visible all the time, then the width will now be consistent with Webkit. Here's the code:

html
{
   overflow:hidden;
   height:100%;
}
body
{
   position:relative;
   overflow-y:scroll;
   height:100%;
   -webkit-overflow-scrolling:touch; /* So iOS Safari gets the inertia & rubber-band effect */
}

If you want to apply this to FF & Opera only, you can resort to CSS hacks:

/* Firefox */
@-moz-document url-prefix()
{
    html
    {
        overflow:hidden;
        height:100%;
    }
    body
    {
        position:relative;
        overflow-y:scroll;
        height:100%;
        /*-webkit-overflow-scrolling:touch;*/
    }
}

/* Opera */
x:-o-prefocus, html
{
    overflow:hidden;
    height:100%;
}
x:-o-prefocus, body
{
    position:relative;
    overflow-y:scroll;
    height:100%;
}

It goes without saying, the caveat is the scrollbar will be visible at all times, which might be an okay compromise.

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I SOLVED this issue by calling the "mqGenie" javascript in the head of my project.

Now the widths of my media queries work fine ( with the same value ) on Chrome, Safari, Firefox and IE with or without scroolbars.

This javascript Adjusts CSS media queries in browsers that include the scrollbar width in the viewport width so they fire at the intended size.

You can download it from this url:

http://stowball.github.io/mqGenie/

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This appears to be the real solution as much as I loathe adding MORE javascript to my project to just accommodate faulty browser behavior. Atleast it's very lightweight clocking in under 1.2KB. I might actually embed this source right into my page instead. –  Chris Marisic Aug 8 at 13:41

You can implement a solution for Firefox pretty easily by using a CSS-hack. After wrapping your content in an extra <div> add this lines to your CSS:

/* Firefox-Hack */
body,  x:-moz-any-link {
    overflow-x: hidden;
}
#wrapper,  x:-moz-any-link {
    margin: 0 -7.5px;
}

Check the jsbin (jsfiddle is down right now)

To have richer responsive experience you could add another media query: another jsbin

The CSS-hack was found at paulirish.com

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This is peripherally related, but I found a way to detect which media-query the browser is actually using at any given moment, without having to muck around with scrollbar and body widths...

Basically, define a an absolutely positioned 1-x-1-pixel-sized list somewhere in your body, with a list-item for each media-query condition you want to be "watchable".

Then in each media-query definition, show/hide the corresponding list-item, and then simply check whether that item is visible from within your script.

Example:

<body>
    ...
    <ul id="mediaQueryHelper">
        <li id="desktop"></li>
    </ul>
</body>

<style type="text/less">
    #mediaQueryHelper {
        position: absolute;
        height: 1px;
        width: 1px;
        visibility: hidden;
        top: -999px;
        left: -999px;
    }

    @media screen and (min-width: 481px)
    {
       #desktop { display: inline; }
    }

    @media screen and (min-width: 320px) and (max-width: 480px)
    {
       #desktop{ display: none; }
    }

</style>

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function()
    {
        var _desktop = $("#desktop");

        $(window).resize(function() {
            console.log("media-query mode: " + _desktop.is(":visible") ? "DESKTOP" : "MOBILE");
        });
    });
</script>
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