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I'm trying to decide between the following two definitions of my generator. Which is better? Which is "more pythonic"? And is there anyway to mitigate the drawbacks of each one?

def myGenerator1(howMany):
    result = [0,0,0]
    yield result
    for i in range(howMany)
        modifyListInPlace(result)
        yield result

for val in myGenerator1(1000):
    useValThenForgetIt(val)

def myGenerator2(howMany):
    result = (0,0,0)
    yield result
    for i in range(howMany)
        result = createNewUpdatedTuple(result)
        yield result

for val in myGenerator2(1000):
    useValThenForgetIt(val)

The first one modifies a value that has been returned by the generator, possibly messing with calling code that I haven't foreseen yet. The second produces 1000 tuples worth of garbage in this case, or more if I increase "howMany"(which I might).

The loops I give as an example are just my current use of the generator. I don't think i would ever save the values that come out of it, but it is a bit of a utility that could possibly be useful elsewhere.

share|improve this question
    
If you're worried about the effect of "garbage" on performance, then test the performance. – Karl Knechtel Nov 16 '11 at 7:51
    
Good point. I'm not specifically concerned about the performance, really more looking for guidance as to whether that kind of design is good practice or frowned upon. – Mike Edwards Nov 16 '11 at 14:12
    
@Raymond thanks very much for the constructive answer to what even I realize is a bit of a silly question. I'm a Python noob so still figuring my way around. I followed the link to itertools and it turns out what I'm looking for is itertools.product([[0,1,2]]*3), but it's informative to know that it returns a bunch of different tuples. – Mike Edwards Nov 16 '11 at 14:15
    
correction, I'm missing a "*" itertools.product(*[[0,1,2]]*3) – Mike Edwards Nov 16 '11 at 16:00
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Looking to the standard library as a guide, the combinatoric functions in the itertools module all return tuples eventhough the underlying algorithm is a mutate-in-place algorithm. For example, look at the code for itertools.permutations.

This design (returning tuples instead of lists) has proven to be robust. I worry that the mutating list approach will create some hard-to-find bugs depending on what the caller is doing with the iterator's return value.

One other thought. I wouldn't worry too much about "creating thousands of tuples worth of garbage" for the unused results. Python's tuple implementation is very good at reusing previously disposed tuples (by using an array of freelists, it can create a new tuple from a previously used one without making a call to the memory allocator). So, the tuple version make be just a performant as the list version or even a little better.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks very much for the constructive answer to what even I realize is a bit of a silly question. I'm a Python noob so still figuring my way around. I followed the link to itertools and it turns out what I'm looking for is itertools.product([[0,1,2]]*3), but it's informative to know that it returns a bunch of different tuples. – Mike Edwards Nov 16 '11 at 14:20

The fact that the first one can return an object, then un-obviously modify it after it's been returned is a HUGE code smell to me, regardless of what language you're using (i.e. it's not an issue of being "pythonic"). Plus, why would you want a function that yields an iterator for the same value over and over again, modifying between yields? Seems very unintuitive to me.

If you use the values, then the tuples created by myGenerator2 aren't garbage. If you use them one at a time, they'll never all exist at the same time, and your program will almost certainly be doing many other memory allocations/deallocations. Unlike the list returned by range(howMany), which will create 1,000 integers that you never actually use (unless you're on Python3, in which case range returns a generator rather than a list).

If there's any chance at all that a caller may want to hang on to a reference to something returned by your generator (and Python programmers generally expect, when given a generator, to be able to go items = list(generator) if they need to use them more than once), then the second is far superior.

share|improve this answer
    
Why? Counting base3 then using the "digits"(trigits?) as indices into a list of lists, then I'm done with the result. Turns out I'm looking for itertools.product([[0,1,2]]*3). – Mike Edwards Nov 16 '11 at 14:23
    
@Mike Just that it's surprising, and surprises cause bugs. Python programmers don't expect iterating over something to have side effects, other than consuming input if it's a generator. It just more tightly couples the callers of the generator to its implementation; callers have to be aware that they can't do whatever they want. Programmer time on debugging and certainly bugs that occur in actual operation are both more expensive than small performance losses in almost every situation. – Ben Nov 16 '11 at 23:19

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