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Thank you for reading this thread. I am trying to finish a program for my computer science class, and i am stumped on why my answers keep coming out as 0+0i.

here is my code:

       public class complex
   {
      private int real, imaginary;
      public complex(int real1, int imaginary1)
      {
      int real=real1;
      int imaginary= imaginary1;
      }

      public int getReal()
      {
         return real;
      }

      public int getImag()
      {
         return imaginary;
      }

      public complex add(complex complex2)
      {
         int real1, real2, imag1, imag2;
         real1=getReal();
         real2=complex2.getReal();
         imag1=getImag();
         imag2=complex2.getImag();

         int sumReal= real1+real2;
         int sumImaginary = imag1+ imag2;
         return new complex(sumReal, sumImaginary);
      }

      public complex subtract(complex complex2)
      {
         int sumReal= getReal() -complex2.getReal();
         int sumImaginary = imaginary - complex2.getImag();
         return new complex (sumReal, sumImaginary);
      }
   // (a1+b1i)(a2+b2)
      public complex multiply(complex complex2)
      {
         int a1, b1, a2, b2, sumReal, sumImaginary;
         a1=getReal();
         b1=getImag();
         a2=complex2.getReal();
         b2=complex2.getImag();
         sumReal=a1*a2-(b1*b2);
         sumImaginary=b1*a2+a1*b2;
         return new complex(sumReal, sumImaginary);
      }


      public String toString()
      {
         String results;
         results= real + "+" + imaginary + "i";
         return results;
      }

and here is my main program to run it:

       import java.util.Scanner;
   public class complexRun
   {
      public static void main (String[] args)
      {
         Scanner scan= new Scanner(System.in);
            int a1, a2, b1, b2;
            a1=scan.nextInt();
            a2=scan.nextInt();
            b1=scan.nextInt();
            b2=scan.nextInt();
            complex complex1= new complex(a1, b1);
            complex complex2 = new complex (a2, b2);

            System.out.println(complex1.getReal());
            System.out.println(complex1.add(complex2));
            System.out.println(complex1.subtract(complex2));
            System.out.println(complex1.multiply(complex2));
            System.out.println(complex1.getReal());
            }

        }

if you run the program, you will notice that whatever you type, the answer will be 0+0i. I believe my logic error lies in my getReal and getImaginary part or in my initial creating of the object, but i am unsure what i have to do to fix it. Any help is appreciated, and i would really like if you could explain what is wrong, not just what to do to fix the error so i can learn from it. Thank you for your time.

share|improve this question
    
tldr; if it's HW tag it so. –  Nishant Nov 16 '11 at 6:02
    
@Nishant: It is tagged homework. –  Cameron Skinner Nov 16 '11 at 6:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is the problem:

public class complex {
  private int real, imaginary;

  public complex(int real1, int imaginary1) {
      int real=real1;
      int imaginary= imaginary1;
  }
  ...
}

You are declaring a local variable called real inside the constructor, which is masking the instance variable called real. Same with imaginary. So the constructor copies the values of real1 and imaginary1 into the local variables real and imaginary, and ignores the instance variables real and imaginary. The local variables immediately go out of scope and are discarded.

Long story short: get rid of the int declarations inside the constructor body.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you soo much! is there a way to add rep or something on here? like a thanks button? –  bts37 Nov 16 '11 at 6:16
    
You can up-vote and accept an answer. Just click the little up arrow on any answer that was helpful, and the check mark on the most helpful answer. –  Cameron Skinner Nov 16 '11 at 6:19
    
Yes ... below the counter of votes there is a short heel. You can click on it to accept an answer. –  Arne Nov 16 '11 at 6:19

Your add, subtract and multiply methods don't mutate the instance of complex on which the method was invoked, but rather they return a new complex number with that value. So you'll need to say (for example):

complex complex1 = new complex(5, 7);
complex complex2 = new complex(6, 8);
complex complex3 = complex1.add(complex2);
System.out.println(complex3.getReal()); // returns 11
System.out.println(complex3.getImaginary()); // returns 15

You can make them mutate their instance by removing the return statement at the end of each function (thereby making the functions void) and instead updating the values of real and imaginary.


Using the add method as an example:

  public void add(complex complex2) {
     int real1, real2, imag1, imag2;
     real1 = getReal();
     real2 = complex2.getReal();
     imag1 = getImag();
     imag2 = complex2.getImag();

     real = real1 + real2;
     imaginary = imag1 + imag2;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
That's not the problem here - and it's not really a problem in any case. It's sometimes good to have immutable objects. –  Cameron Skinner Nov 16 '11 at 6:06
    
I understand the purpose and benefits of immutability, which is one of the reasons why I've explained both how to use it as is, and how to make it mutable. However, the call to complex1.getReal() at the end led me to believe that the OP was expecting the value of complex1.getReal() to change after those arithmetic operations. It's possible that's not what the OP was looking for, in which case this answer is not applicable, but if it is, then the details are here. –  Jonathan Newmuis Nov 16 '11 at 6:15
    
That's fair enough, but (im)mutability is not the problem in this case. It's a good answer apart from that :) –  Cameron Skinner Nov 16 '11 at 6:17
    
whoops, the call to getReal() was just a check to see if my getReal was working that i forgot to delete, sorry about the confusion. –  bts37 Nov 16 '11 at 6:20

Inside the complex constructor, dont declare the real and imaginary variables. Instead use this.real = real1 and this.imaginary = imaginary1

share|improve this answer

Change your complex function of 1st class as...
when u write int real=real1;and int imaginary= imaginary1; its create new variable which can't be access outside the function coz its local of complex(int real1, int imaginary1)... so that was the problem

  public complex(int real1, int imaginary1)
  {
   this.real=real1;  // the problem was there
   this.imaginary= imaginary1;  // the problem was there
  }
share|improve this answer

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