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Which is the best and the simplest hash function which generate unique hash values for integers below 5000?

Actual problem is that I have an integer array of size around 50 containing values between 1 to 5000. Now I have to do reverse mapping i.e given a value and I have to find out the index at which it is stored. I know that it can be done by using binary search as my array is sorted.

Please don't suggest any hash libraries for C.

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what have you tried till now ? –  krammer Nov 16 '11 at 6:53
2  
Why can't you use the number as its own hash? –  Blender Nov 16 '11 at 6:54
    
@Blender: yes that possible but in that case I have to create a Hash Table of size 5000 and that's why I came here to find a better way. If I don't get any, I will go for that only. –  Ravi Gupta Nov 16 '11 at 7:00
2  
If the numbers range from 1...5000, then there are 5000 possible hashes (assuming you want unique hashes, which makes sense for searching). Either way you will be creating 5000 hashes, so why not go for the trivial solution? –  Blender Nov 16 '11 at 7:01
    
@blender: actually I have a constant array of fixed size 50 and the value of this not going to change in the entire life cycle of the project. So I already have the set of values and I want to generate unique hash for those values only. If it is a generic case then the thing you are saying is absolutely correct. If you want the values, I can also provide that. –  Ravi Gupta Nov 16 '11 at 14:32

2 Answers 2

Unless 5 KB of array space for 8-bit (char) values is too big, don't bother with a hash - use the numbers as indexes into an array of characters, storing 1 to indicate that the number is used and 0 to indicate it is not used. You can reduce that further by using the array as a bit map (so you need about 625 bytes to store 5000 bits) for the storage, plus a little code to calculate the right bit position to look at.

Or, given that you need to find the index into an array of 50 integers, use the 5 KB of space to store the indexes into the array of 50 integers, with perhaps -1 indicating that the number is not in use.

int main_array[50];
signed char aux_array[5000];

// initialize aux_array to all -1
for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(aux_array); i++)
    aux_array[i] = -1;
// for each value `v` in main_array, store its index `i` in `aux_array[v]`
for (int i = 0; i < num_values; i++)
{
    int v = main_array[i];
    if (aux_array[v] != -1)
        ...non-unique data in main_array...
    aux_array[v] = i;
}

The inverse lookup checks in aux_array to see if the index is -1 (not present) or non-negative to indicate where it is found. This is an inverted index. If you end up needing more than 127 values, you can switch to unsigned char or short instead of signed char (with appropriate adjustments to the marker value, -1 in my example).

Hashing is probably not cost effective.

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actually I have a constant array of fixed size 50 and the value of this not going to change in the entire life cycle of the project. So I already have the set of values and I want to generate unique hash for those values only. If it is a generic case then the thing you are saying is absolutely correct. If you want the values, I can also provide that. –  Ravi Gupta Nov 16 '11 at 14:34

Would just using a simple mod 50 work?

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Probably not - it doesn't guarantee uniqueness. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 16 '11 at 7:30

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