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In linq how can i diffentiate the date, like in sql we use datediff(mm,getdate(),getdate())=0 now how can i write in linq, can any body help me thank you.

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I don't know if I understand you correctly, but you can extract the date part by calling the Year, Month, Day, etc method on DateTime Objects ( see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.datetime.aspx ). –  Dennis Nov 16 '11 at 7:46

3 Answers 3

You can use this code for comparing two dates using linq in C#

            DateTime d1 = myDate1;
            DateTime d2 = myDate2;
            TimeSpan t1 = d2.Subtract(d1);
            totalDays = t1.Days;
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There's nothing special in Linq about date and time handling, so we should look at the plain .Net facilities.

A DateTime in C# is a date and time.

To get just the date component in C#, try this:

var now = DateTime.UtcNow; // or DateTime.Now for local time/day
DateTime today = now.Date;

This will give you the date and time at midnight of the same day.

If you want to get the difference in days between two DateTime objects:

public TimeSpan DiffDates(DateTime d1, DateTime d2)
{
    return d1.Date - d2.Date;
}

// ...

if(DiffDates(dateTime1, dateTime2) == TimeSpan.Zero)
{
    // ...
}

Alternately you could check directly if the dates are equal:

if(dateTime1.Date == dateTime2.Date)
{
    // ...
}

If you skip the .Date property, then you will get incorrect results.

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I think this is what you want:

var query = from entity in entities
            where entity.SomeDateTime.Date == anotherDateTime.Date
            select entity;

This only compares dates and not times.

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