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I am trying to understand nested loops by getting this program to work. I'd like to use the "each do" way of looping, if possible. Right now the loop executes all of the 1st loop, then 2nd...etc...I'd like to do, execute 1st loop 1 time, then fall down to 2nd loop one time...etc. Here is my code (pasted below)

Desired output would be something like this:

index                       3.0                  3.0
+-------------------------------------------------------+
0                          -23.4                -23.4
1                       -2226.74             -2226.74
2                   -1.93464e+07         -1.93464e+07

Code

class LogisticsFunction
  puts "Enter two numbers, both between 0 and 1 (example: .25 .55)."
  puts "After entering the two numbers tell us how many times you"
  puts "want the program to iterate the values (example: 1)."

  puts "Please enter the first number: "
  num1 = gets.chomp

  puts "Enter your second number: "
  num2 = gets.chomp

  puts "Enter the number of times you want the program to iterate: "
  iter = gets.chomp

  print "index".rjust(1)
  print num1.rjust(20)
  puts num2.rjust(30)
  puts "+-------------------------------------------------------+"

  (1..iter.to_i).each do |i|
    print i
  end
    (1..iter.to_i).each do |i|
      num1 = (3.9) * num1.to_f * (1-num1.to_f)
        print num1
    end
      (1..iter.to_i).each do |i|
        num2 = (3.9) * num2.to_f * (1-num2.to_f)
          print num2
      end
end
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Do you only want this for display in given way? –  Naren Sisodiya Nov 16 '11 at 9:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you don't have to run with three loop, following will give the desire output

(1..iter.to_i).each do |i|
  print i
  num1 = (3.9) * num1.to_f * (1-num1.to_f)
  print num1.to_s.rjust(20)
  num2 = (3.9) * num2.to_f * (1-num2.to_f)
  print num2.to_s.rjust(30)
end
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Running this code: pastie.org/2871457 gives me this error, 1logistics_functionz.rb:23:in block in <class:LogisticsFunction>': undefined method rjust' for -23.4:Float (NoMethodError) from logistics_functionz.rb:20:in each' from logistics_functionz.rb:20:in <class:LogisticsFunction>' from logistics_functionz.rb:1:in `<main>' –  jimmyc3po Nov 16 '11 at 9:54
    
changed the code, need to convert num1 and num2 in string to use rjust method. try it now –  Naren Sisodiya Nov 16 '11 at 10:38
    
Cool! This was exactly what I was trying to do, in the style of coding as well. Thanks so much for the help, much appreciated! I learn something as well. :) –  jimmyc3po Nov 16 '11 at 15:07

Your loops aren't actually nested. They are in fact one after the other. This is why they are running one after the other. To nest them - you have to put them inside of each other. eg:

Not nested

(1..iter.to_i).each do |i|
   # stuff for loop 1 is done here
end # this closes the first loop - the entire first loop will run now

(1..iter.to_i).each do |j|
   # stuff for loop 2 is done here
end # this closes the second loop - the entire second loop will run now

Nested:

(1..iter.to_i).each do |i|
   # stuff for loop 1 is done here
  (1..iter.to_i) .each do |j|
     # stuff for loop 2 is done here
  end # this closes the second loop - the second loop will run again now
  # it will run each time the first loop is run
end # this closes the first loop - it will run i times
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1  
This helps as well. Thanks. –  jimmyc3po Nov 16 '11 at 16:57

Wouldnt something like this solve your problem?

(1..iter.to_i).each do |i|
  num1 = (3.9) * num1.to_f * (1-num1.to_f)
  print num1
  num2 = (3.9) * num2.to_f * (1-num2.to_f)
  print num2
end

From what I can see you dont even use the i variable. So in theory you could just do

iter.to_i.times do
   # stuff
end
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