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I want to write the regex pattern which should match the string in between also.

For example:

I have writtenthe regex pattern like this

^((?!mystring).)*$

Which means match words which doesnot contain mystring. But i want regex pattern to match like this.

mystringabcdfrevrgf

regex matcher should return

abcdfrevrgf

How will i achieve this, Please help Thanks in advance.

Answer:

((?!mystring)(.*))$
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I think you need a regex replace then and not a match. See @Tim's answer. He got all bases covered. –  FailedDev Nov 16 '11 at 9:53
1  
Your "answer" - ((?!mystring)(.*))$ - matches ystringabcdfrevrgf, not abcdfrevrgf. Unless you're using .NET with the RightToLeft option selected, that is. What flavor are you using, anyway? Please tag the question accordingly. –  Alan Moore Nov 16 '11 at 11:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Wouldn't it be easier to remove mystring from the string you're matching?

As in (Python example):

>>> re.sub("mystring", "", "mystringabcdfrevrgf")
'abcdfrevrgf'

which of course only makes sense if mystring is in fact a regex, like

>>> re.sub("my.*?g", "", "xyzmystringabcdfrevrgf")
'xyzabcdfrevrgf'

Otherwise, plain string manipulation functions would be faster, of course.

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It sounds like you want this:

var str = 'mystringabcdfrevrgf';
var regex = /^mystring(.*)$/;

var result = str.match(regex)[1];
//result contains 'abcdfrevrgf'
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Each match returned by regular expression engine is a continuous string. Given a text XYZ and the goal of XZ, the engine can either return X and Z as 2 matches and then leave concatenation up to user, it can match Y and do a replace with empty string. It cannot match XZ directly because it's not a continuous string. If you look at internal implementations of regular expression engines, you will see that each match is usually defined with a pair of integers (matchStartIndex, matchEndIndex or matchStartIndex, matchLength), making it impossible for a match to leave out characters in the middle.

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